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       December 2012 Congratulations to Katie H., Jack M, Madison S., Jason S., and Alex S.who will be representing our school at the district STEM Fair in February! Way to go Falcons! Congratulations to our Grade 5 students Aden and Noah and our Grade 4 students Aidan and Megan who will be representing FishHawk Creek at the STEM Fair in February, 2012 for their Science Fair projects! Congratulations to our Grade 4 Science Fair winners Sophia, Dylan D. , John K. , and Sarah who will be representing FishHawk Creek at the 2011 Hillsborough Regional Science Fair in February. CONGRATULATIONS TO SOPHIA B., DYLAN D., SARAH J., & JOHN K. WHO WERE AWARDED SUPERIOR FOR THEIR PROJECT METEORITE MADNESS AT THE 2011 HILLSBORUGH SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FAIR!!!!! AWESOME WORK!! & Congratulations to our Grade 3 and Grade 5 AGP Hillsborough Regional Science and Engineering Fair February 25, 2010 winners! Noah (Bronze Medal), Ellen (Gold Medal), and Christian (Gold Medal) CONGRATULATIONS to Jenna       
Mrs. Vaughn Academically Gifted Program (AGP)
Grades 3, 4 and 5 Science
 
 
 
 
 

Welcome to Mrs. Vaughn's Webpage!
***Parents,  If you are not receiving my weekly emails please send me an email so that I can put your email on the list

Grades 4 and 5 Students and Parents -
Please click on the link to left left pertaining to your grade level for updates
Grade 4 parents there is a glitch on my webpage.  If you are not receiving my weekly updates via email please email me.


 
cid:image001.jpg@01CF7027.E478A120  and NASA's EarthKAM Missions are Coming Soon! - November 4 - 7, 2014 !

Sponsored by Sally Ride Science and NASA, ISS EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to capture images of our Earth from a digital camera on board the International Space Station. The next mission will run from November 4-7, 2014. .
Contact Mrs. Vaughn if you need more codes.  Codes will be passed out Monday, November 3 or sooner.

National Geographic Login Information

myngconnect.com

Every student has a login in the Nat Geo system through their homeroom.  They can login at any time using

        Login:          Lunch number
        Password:               "h"birth month birth year

example:                Login:          1234567
                        Password:               h42004    (April, 2004)



91414_14613_0.pngCan be found in student STEM Fair Notebooks.
Our school STEM Fair will be held during the week of December 1, 2014.
Winners will participate in the regional STEM Fair on February 4, 2015.


 stargazing_2009.gif


**Students may bring to the first day of AGP class**

3rd, 4th, and 5th Grade Science Supply List   **Students may bring to the first day of AGP class**
2 composition notebooks (hard cover ñ no spirals) Please write student name on front cover.
2 dozen pencils (#2)
1 large glue stick
1 cloth book cover (suggested for Science text)
1 yellow highlighter

August 2014
Welcome Back Students and Parents!  
Gifted - Grades 1-5 will be holding our "Meet and Greet" in the Media Center.  Please stop by during 4-6 on Thursday, August 14 so that we can meet your child and you!



July 15-19, 2014  EarthKAM Mission begins.  Ask your parent to email Mrs. Vaughn if you would like some codes.

July 16, 2014  Cygnus is scheduled to arrive at the station at 6:39 am.

July 13, 2014  12:52 pm   MISSION PAYLOAD LAUNCHED@  Successful launch of the lettuce seeds (and many other science experiments and supplies) on the Antares rocket launching from NASA's Wallop Flight Facility in Virginia.  Many thanks to MOSI for allowing us to view the launch from the big screen!   

July 3, 2014  Great success for the Lettuce Team! Miranda, Srinidhi, and Isabelle just returned from Washington DC presenting their ground truth data at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum


April 10, 2014  Lettuce to be grown on the space station



Students science experiment bound for space travel
Three of our fifth graders have a project set to launch to the International Space Station


Science of the Olympic Winter Games 2010



Photo of ice skater, words Science of the Winter Olympic Games, and logos of NBC Learn, NSF and Vancover Olympics


NBC Learn, the educational arm of NBC News, has teamed up with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to produce Science of the Olympic Winter Games, a 16-part video series that explores the science behind individual Olympic events, including Downhill and Aerial Skiing, Speed Skating and Figure Skating, Curling and Hockey, and Ski Jumping, Bobsledding and Snowboarding.

This groundbreaking project between the NSF and NBC Learn uses the global spotlight of the Olympics to make science more accessible and more interesting to students by showing how science helps athletes fulfill the Olympic motto: Citius, Altius, Fortius--Swifter, Higher, Stronger. Read more about the "Science of the Olympic Winter Games."




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  1. NASA - What's Up for  February 2014?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  2. coming soon!
  3. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/
  4. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/index.php?id=1276
  5. NASA - What's Up for January  2014?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  1. NASA - What's Up for  2013?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
International Space Station Sighting Locations
Location: Tampa, Florida, United States


35 above W
12 above NNE
Facebook   Twitter 
Wed Dec 11, 6:22 PM
3 min
14°
11 above WNW
10 above N

for the link - http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/sightings/index.cfm
Questions To use While Writing Your Conclusion

  • My hypothesis was supported (or not supported) by the data. (Explain)
  • I found out that…
  • If I were to do this project again, I would change…because…..
  • The way this is connected to the real world is…A problem I had or unusual event was….

  • A problem I had or unusual event was….

  • Describe your data in detail. What does your data mean?
  • Compare the results with your background information.
  • Explain why the experiment is important.
NASA's EarthKAM Mission is this Week -  November 12-15!

Sponsored by NASA, ISS EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to capture images of our Earth from a digital camera on board the International Space Station. The next mission will run from April 23 through April 26, 2013.

The second Fall EarthKAM mission begins on Tuesday, November 12, 2013! To  
help you prepare, we have included a link to a tutorial on how to use the  
Mission pages and make photo requests. Please use this document during the  
mission and feel free to email us with any questions you may have. We are  
always here to help!

Mission User Guide:

Codewords for the mission have already been sent out. Please contact us if  
you did not receive your codewords.

Best of luck with your photo requests!

  1. NASA - What's Up for November  2013?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory


If you are not receiving my weekly emails please send me an email so that I can place you on the list.
mary.vaughn@sdhc.k12.fl.us

National Geographic Login Information
(Will be up and running after the 20 day count)
myngconnect.com

Every student has a login in the Nat Geo system through their homeroom.  They can login at any time using

        Login:          Lunch number
        Password:               "h"birth month birth year

example:                Login:          1234567
                        Password:               h42004    (April, 2004)
________________________________________________________________________


982013_92808_0.png

Our school STEM Fair will be held during the week of ________________, 2013.

Winners will participate in the regional STEM Fair on February 11, 2014.



Date Assigned- Due Date
Things to Do
Completed? (Teacher Initials)
Sept.9-
DUE Sept. 16
Decide your topic and which question you will investigate. Remember, your question must be TESTABLE and MEASURABLE. Begin keeping a data log. Write in your data log.
September 16-
DUE Sept. 23
Write the purpose for your investigation. Do any necessary research of your topic. Write in your data log.
Research Due October 1
September 23-
DUE Sept. 30

Write your hypothesis. Remember, this is a statement giving a possible answer to the question that you are testing in your experiment. Write in your data log.
Research Due October 1
September 30-
DUE October 7
Create a materials list of what you will need in order to conduct your experiment. Begin to collect your materials. Write in your data log.
October 7-
DUE Oct. 14
Create your VARIABLES list. Tell what the manipulated (independent), responding (dependent), and constant (controlled) variables will be.
Write in your data log.
October 14-
DUE Oct. 22
Write your step-by-step directions for your experiment. Be clear and concise. Include specific details, numbers, etc! Write in your data log.
October 28-
DUE Nov. 4
Create a data chart that you will use to collect your data. Begin (or continue) to collect data for your experiment! Write in your data log.
November 4-
DUE Nov. 12
Graph your data. Finish collecting data for your experiment! Create a graph of the data you collected. Does your data call for a bar graph or a line graph? Write in your data log.
November 12-
DUE  Nov. 15
Utilize this week to finalize student STEM Fair projects
Write your conclusion. Tell whether your hypothesis was supported by your data or not. Tell about unusual findings and explain what you LEARNED from the investigation. Write in your data log.
Finalize experiment this week! Completed Data Logs are DUE!
Nov.18-
DUE Nov. 22

Create your project display to showcase your investigation. Make sure it is neat, organized, and attractive. Think of a catchy title for your investigation. Make sure your data log is included.
To Be Determined -Only for students competing at the district level.
FINAL DUE DATE: Nov. 22
Turn your completed STEM project and data log into your teacher.


Now think: What questions do you still have? How could you change your experiment if you were to re-do it? Is there something else about this topic that you want to investigate? Record lingering questions in your science notebook for future investigations!





Grade 3, 4, and 5 Supply List Science AGP Mrs. Vaughn
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
2 dozen pencils (#2)
1 large glue stick  
1 cloth book cover (suggested for Science text)

2013-2014 "Gifted Meet and Greet"  Thursday, August 15th from 4:00-6:00pm
To our amazing families of gifted students,
Please plan on stopping by the Media Center, at your convenience, during meet and greet to find out who your child will have for gifted.
We are looking forward to a great school year!

Get your passport ready for the 2013-2014 school year!


worldfdp0.gif

___________________________________________________________________________________
National Geographic Login Information
(Will be up and running after the 20 day count)
myngconnect.com

Every student has a login in the Nat Geo system through their homeroom.  They can login at any time using

        Login:          Lunch number
        Password:               "h"birth month birth year

example:                Login:          1234567
                        Password:               h42004    (April, 2004)
___________________________________________________________________
  1. NASA - What's Up for August 2013?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory
What's up for August 2013?
08.01.13
Enjoy this summer's celestial fireworks display of the most popular meteor shower of the year on August 12.
  1. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/?id=1233
  2. NASA - What's Up for June 2013?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  1. http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/index.php?id=1222


  2. 5/201/3 Article from the Tampa Tribune on the Astronaut Chat.

  1. Congratulations Students!
FishHawk Creek Elementary has been selected as one of the top five entries of North America in the ISS EarthKAM Erosion Challenge!  As a reward, you are invited to a LIVE videoconference with Astronaut Mike Fincke Friday, May 17!!!!

5313_50618_0.jpg
  1.                                      Image captured of Madagascar from the International Space Station!
  2. NASA - What's Up for May 2013?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  1. Spot popular astronomical sights this month including nebulae, a galaxy trio and the site of a recent planetary discovery.
  2. www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/index.php?all_videos&id=1214EndFragment-->
NASA's EarthKAM Mission is this Week -  April 23-26!

Sponsored by NASA, ISS EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to capture images of our Earth from a digital camera on board the International Space Station. The next mission will run from April 23 through April 26, 2013.

During this mission, students can also enter the ISS EarthKAM Erosion Challenge. Winning schools will get to talk live with an astronaut!  

Students are taking part in the April 2013 ISS EarthKAM mission including the ISS EarthKAM Erosion Challenge. Winning schools will get to talk live with an astronaut!

Weathering and erosion create many of Earthís unique landforms. During the April 23 through April 26, 2013 EarthKAM mission, students are asked to request images of locations on Earth that have undergone weathering and/or erosion, such as glaciers, mountains, coastlines, river deltas, and sand dunes. Submit one of the images you take, along with a paragraph (250 words or less) describing how the image shows the effects of weathering and/or erosion to the ISS EarthKAM Erosion Challenge. 

School groups that submit the top five entries* will be invited to a live videoconference with a NASA astronaut at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas on May 17, 2013. During this interactive videoconference, students will have a chance to share their winning images and chat with the astronaut. All schools participating in the mission will be invited to view the webcast and submit questions online for the astronaut.

Good luck Falcons!

What's Up for the Month of April 2013?  NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory


What's Up for the Month of March 2013? - NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Spot The Space Station Over Your Backyard With New NASA Service On the 12th anniversary of crews continuously living and working aboard the International Space Station, NASA announced Friday a new service to help people see the orbiting laboratory when it passes overhead.  

What's Up for the Month of February 2013? - NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory


This is an amazing PowerPoint of Earth taken from satellites.


What's Up for the Month of January 2013? - NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Curiosity - Mars Science Laboratory

NASA's Eyes on the Solar System

GRAIL Mission - Gravity Recovery and Interior Mission


9/27/11    National Geographic website


                                                                OR


AGP Open House Grades 3, 4, & 5 Wednesday, September 5, 2012

5-5:30 Grade 4 & 5
5:30-6 Grade 3

Please plan on meeting in rooms 502 and 504.


Hillsborough County STEM Fair Project Timeline

September 10
Introduction to STEM Fair Logs & Topics
September 17
Topics Due; “How to write Purpose & Research”
September 24
Purpose Due & Research; How to write an Hypothesis
October 1
Hypothesis Due along with Research Paper ; How to write materials lists
October 8
Materials list due; How to write Variables
October 15
Variables due; How to write Step by Step directions
**October 22
Step by Step Directions due; How to collect your data
October 29
Data Collection
November 5
Data Due; How to Draw Conclusions
November 12
Veterans’ Day; STEM Fair Project Week
Create a Graph   http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/

Meet and Greet Thursday, August 16, 2012 4-6 pm

Please plan to meet your child's gifted teacher in the Media Center.  We will be passing out schedules and supply list.  We look forward to seeing all of you!

(Please see below for the supply list for AGP Science Grades 3, 4, 5.)

Mrs. Vaughn, Mrs. Williams, Mrs. Marshall, and Mrs. Kirby



NASA's Curiosity Rover landed on Mars in the early hours of  Monday, August 6!  It was a very exciting time for all of the engineers and scientist and I was so fortunate to be in Pasadena at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the same time!


NASA's Curiosity Rover will be landing  on Mars in the early hours of  Monday, August 6!
See the following links for more information:






Friday, August 3, 2012
Hi Everyone!  
We are getting excited about the new school year beginnning soon and are thrilled to have a new addition to our AGP Team this year -Mrs. Kristy Williams! Mrs. Williams is coming to us from South Carolina with a ton of experience.  More information will be forthcoming as to which AGP teacher(s) your child will have. Please check back the week of August 13 - before Meet and Greet on Thursday, August August 16th 4-6 pm so that you can stop in and see all of us.

For you early shoppers here is a list for Grades 3, 4, and 5 AGP Science 2012-2013

Grade 3 Supply List Science AGP
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
2 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
colored pencils (girls)
Crayola thick markers (boys)
1 large glue stick
cloth book cover (suggested for new Science text)

Grade 4 Supply List Science AGP
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
2 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
colored pencils (girls)
crayons #24 (boys)
1 large glue stick
cloth book cover (suggested for new Science text)


Grade 5 Supply List Science AGP
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
2 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
Crayola markers thin
1 large glue stick
cloth book cover (suggested for new Science text)


Transit of Venus - June 5, 2012
The Venus Transit happens on June 5th/6th. Don’t miss it or you may never see it again, at least not until 2117!
 
We will be coming to you LIVE on the web at http://venustransit.nasa.gov.
There you will see the transit webcast from Mauna Kea which will automatically begin to play just prior to first contact 11:55 Hawaiian Time to finish. 



** You don't need a special password to access the webcast.  Also, anyone who comes to "submit an event" will be directed to enter their information in a new form, which will be used to populate the Event Locations Map after the event. **
 
Everything is available on the website home page.  But don’t wait until then… come visit us now at http://venustransit.nasa.gov.
 
When you visit:
·         Add your pictures to the Flickr Stream
·         See the images from the ISS
·         See additional Non-Video Streams at the bottom of the page
 
Don’t forget to take part in the Venus Transit Observing Challenge.  Everything you’ll need is availablehttp://venustransit.nasa.gov/2012/getinvolved/aa.php SPACE STATION SIGHTING: For sighting opportunities from specific cities in Florida, visit


NASA Science News for May 2, 2012

The full Moon of May 5-6, 2012, is a perigee moon, as much as 14% bigger and 30% brighter than other full moons of 2012.





  1. www.jpl.nasa.gov/video/Cached - Similar
  2. You +1'd this publicly. Undo
  3. 9 hours ago – View sunspots and a solar eclipse through solar-safe 'scopes this month.


4262012_81218_0.jpg     4262012_81227_1.png

Students Continue To Select Pictures of the Moon!

GRAIL was launched to the Moon September 10, 2011 and now the twin GRAIL spacecrafts are orbiting the Moon.  Middle School students are being given the opportunity to select the photo sites that are being taken by the twin spacecraft Ebb and Flow.  Your child will be working on selecting those pictures that will be taken.  Your child will be also learning more about the Moon, its formation including the various craters and Maria that are on the Moon.  Sally Ride Science is sponsoring the education piece on this mission. I have been fortunate enough to be selected to be part of these trainings for the past two years across the country.  

For more information you may log onto:
I look forward to working with your child in gaining more knowledge about the Moon.


Great article on the moving of the Space Shuttle Discovery  and other shuttles to their permanent homes.


What's Up for April 2012?
Click on  this video link to learn what is happening in the Solar System for the month of April.  View Saturn all night this month, and view icy moons through a telescope.


Space Weather News for March 25, 2012

SUNSET SKY SHOW: A month ago, Venus, Jupiter and the crescent Moon aligned beautifully for evening sky watchers around the world. Tonight it's happening again. On March 25th and 26th, the three will form a bright celestial triangle in the western sky at sunset.   Check http://spaceweather.com for photos and observing tips.

3/8/12
360 VR Panorama of Discovery's Flight and Mid Decks
Here is a link to a new interactive spherical 360VR panorama of Discovery's flight & mid decks taken last week. Click on the url or the thumbnail to load the viewer on your web browser.  (This viewer will also work with iPhone and iPad.) Click on the blue dot (behind the Commander’s seat) to go to the mid deck.  This is the final configuration before it goes to the Smithsonian.



3/7/12


News release: 2012-061                                                                    March 7, 2012

NASA's Twin GRAIL Spacecraft Begin Collecting Lunar Science Data

The full version of this story with accompanying images is at:








NASA Science News for Feb. 17, 2012

The brightest planets in the night sky are aligning for a must-see show in late February and March 2012. You can start looking tonight.




NASA's Twin Grail Spacecraft Reunite in Lunar Orbit


PASADENA, Calif. -- A camera aboard one of NASA's twin Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) lunar spacecraft has returned its first unique view of the far side of the moon. MoonKAM, or Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle school students, will be used by students nationwide to select lunar images for study.

GRAIL consists of two identical spacecraft, recently named Ebb and Flow, each of which is equipped with a MoonKAM. The images were taken as part of a test of Ebb's MoonKAM on Jan. 19. The GRAIL project plans to test the MoonKAM aboard Flow at a later date.


In the video, the north pole of the moon is visible at the top of the screen as the spacecraft flie s toward the lunar south pole. One of the first prominent geological features seen on the lower third of the moon is the Mare Orientale, a 560-mile-wide (900 kilometer) impact basin that straddles both the moon's near and far side.

The clip ends with rugged terrain just short of the lunar south pole. To the left of center, near the bottom of the screen, is the 93-mile-wide (149 kilometer) Drygalski crater with a distinctive star-shaped formation in the middle. The formation is a central peak, created many billions of years ago by a comet or asteroid impact.

The quality of the video is excellent and should energize our MoonKAM students as they prepare to explore the moon," said Maria Zuber, GRAIL principal investigator from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

The twin spacecraft successfully achieved lunar orbit this past New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. Previously named GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B, the washing machine-sized spacecraft received their new names from fourth graders at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School in Bozeman, Mont., following a nationwide student naming contest.


To view the 30-second video clip, visit: http://go.nasa.gov/zZXAPs .






Here is a fantastic view of Discovery on the launch pad. 
Follow the instructions under the picture – watch Full-screen and move your mouse over the photo.
Amazing!!
 
 


1/25/12
SMath-Header-Logo.png
        The SMATH website is up and running again at:


What is it?
  • Pictures and vieos of math and science in our everyday lives
  • Blog with other teachers, students and the SMATH team



January 17, 2012

Twin NASA spacecraft have new names, thanks to elementary students in Bozeman, Mont. Their winning entry, "Ebb and Flow," was selected as part of a nationwide school contest that began in October 2011.



NASA Science News for Jan. 12, 2012

Astronomers are still scratching their heads over Comet Lovejoy, which plunged through the atmosphere of the sun in December and, against all odds, survived. The comet is now receding into the outer solar system leaving many mysteries behind.


A video version of this story is available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w75lBn1QIaI


Last January my students participated in a

Live Mars Science Lab Student Chat from January 2011
On Thursday, January 27, 2011 my students in Grade 3, 4 participated in a live Mars Science Laboratory student chat.  The chat, sponsored by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California asked for classes to submit three questions.  Two questions from our FishHawk Creek AGP students in Grades 3 and 4 were selected!

The link can be viewed at:




Dec 29, 2011 ñ GRAIL-A Spacecraft Arrives at the Moon, What's Up for January? .... What's Up January 2011: Shooting star fireworks ring in the new year .


CONFERENCE NIGHT is Thursday, October 19th
Please see email from 10/3 on the schedule

9/27/11    National Geographic website




Open  House  AGP Science Grades 4, 5 -
Thursday, September 22 5-5:30 or 5:30-6  Room 502

To find out what is happening in the night sky for September click on the following link:

National Geographic student login will be coming soon!  Stay tuned for updates!

AGP Schedule 2011-2012
Hello AGP Parents!  Please come and see us during Open House!
Grade 1, 2 Mrs. Marshall Rm.  #207
Grade 3 Math Mrs. Marshall Rm. #207, Ms. Correll Rm.  #325
Grade 4 Science Mrs. Vaughn Rm. #502, Math Mrs. Kirby Rm. #504
Grade 5 Science Mrs. Vaughn Rm. #502,  Math Mrs. Kirby Rm. #504


Hello Parents and Students!
I am thrilled to be having your students back very soon and look forward to seeing many of you on Thursday, August 18 at Open House from 4-6.

I will be teaching the Science to Grades 4 and 5.   Mrs. Kirby will be teaching the Math to Grades 4 and 5.

I have moved to the new wing and can be found in room #502.  (first classroom  on the right)  Mrs. Kirby is right next to me.

School Supplies for Science are:


Grade 4 Supply List  Science AGP Mrs. Vaughn
3 composition notebooks  (hard cover - no spirals)
2 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
colored pencils (girls)
crayons #24  (boys)
1 large glue stick
cloth book cover (suggested for new Science text)


Grade 5 Supply List  Science AGP Mrs. Vaughn
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
2 dozen pencils  (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
Crayola markers thick or thin
1 large glue stick
cloth book cover (suggested for new Science text)


Aug 3, 2010 ñ If you've never seen a meteor shower, this month's Perseids are a perfect introduction.


What's Up For June?


 Hi Everyone,
Have an awesome Summer!  If you have some extra time, perhaps a rainy day here are some ideas to keep you busy.
Ideas for Summer:

Check this site to see if the ISS will be in your sky!


Renzulli Learning   http://www.renzullilearning.com    should be up and running or

Summer Sparklers is a collection of teacher-reviewed web resources for students of various ages to enjoy learning all summer long. The collection includes many sites where students and parents can create something together, sites that reinforce skills to prevent "summer slide," and challenges to spark thinking at any age. Though the page is written by teachers for teachers, parents will also appreciate the "At home" suggestions, especially on a rainy day. Be sure to share the link as you send students off for summer.

or
Another website to continue to keep up their speed in math with their facts is xtramath.org  or  http://www.cdnportfolio.net/smileyfacemath/

Here are some neat Space activities!

1.       In commemoration of the 30th Anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program, NASA, the National Institute of Aerospace and USA TODAY invite students, ages 9-17, to participate in the NASA Space Shuttle Art Competition by creating an original artwork that reflects the impact of the Space Shuttle program on our planet and in our lives. As a component of the Because It Flew (BIF) program students are asked to submit an individual artwork with a 250-word essay explaining their artistic entries. The submissions will be reviewed by an expert panel of artists and the top six entries will receive a cash prize, a private tutoring session with an accomplished USA TODAY graphic artist, and a certificate of accomplishment. The deadline for submission is August 5, 2011.


BIF also offers teachers, sponsors, and parents an opportunity to engage their students with FREE educational activities and online NASA resources that allows students to discover the scientific and technological advances that have emerged Because It Flew.

 
Encourage students and children to explore the history of the Space Shuttle Program, upload their photo and submit their artwork and essay!

 For more information on the NASA Space Shuttle Art Competition and to download free educational materials visit the site at:



2.        Students can get the Space Shuttle experience and discover even more about the Space Shuttle Program's accomplishments, what it takes to launch a shuttle, astronaut living, how the program affects life daily here on Earth and much more through the Space Shuttle Experience website! The site offers many interactive features including trivia games with Facebook score sharing, a poll for users to vote on the program's greatest achievement and a virtual signature wall which gives users the opportunity to leave a personal message to the program. The Space Shuttle Experience site also includes lesson plans for educators. 


 
3.       Additionally, the successful Face in Space website now allows the public to upload their face or name for the final STS-135 mission. Upon completion of the mission, participants will receive a personalized flight certificate signed by the mission commander! The mission is scheduled for a July 8th launch so you still have time! https://faceinspace.nasa.gov

 

 

Check out this video from Jane Houston Jones at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory explaining the May skies and the line-up of four planets.


Upcoming Florida Association for the Gifted Conference this May in Tampa!

Want to connect with other Gifted educators from around the state?  
Want to know how YOU can help your Gifted students excel?
Want to know what is current in the world of Gifted Education?
Want to hear from the experts in the field of Gifted Education?
Are you a parent of a Gifted child and want to know how you can maximize their potential?

Attend the May 2011 Florida Association for the Gifted (FLAG) conference located conveniently RIGHT here in the Tampa area at the University of South Florida.  FLAG is an affiliate of the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC).  Don't miss your chance to attend a professional conference minus the expensive travel and hotel.

FLAG and USF are busy planning an outstanding event that will
draw participants from around the state. Carolyn Coil is scheduled to
be our keynote speaker at the May FLAG/USF Conference.
Additionally, outstanding presenters from around the state will share
their expertise and ideas at our numerous breakout sessions. Visit
www.flagifted.org/file/conference.html for details on sessions offered
and registration link.
Learn how to Encourage Achievement, about Gifted students
with Aspergers, the State of the State for Gifted in Florida, the Highs
and Lows of Emotional and Spiritual Giftedness, Creativity and much
more. Your admission includes all sessions, luncheon and auction to
benefit the Scobee scholarship.
$60 Members
$90 includes membership or renewal
$95 non-members
THINKING OUTSIDE THE CUBE:
New Dimensions in Gifted Education
FLAG/USF Conference
University of South Florida - 4202 E. Fowler Avenue - Tampa
May 14, 2011 - 8 am - 5 pm
For more information email flagifted@gmail.com or visit www.flagifted.org

What's Up For April?
Check out this video from Jane Houston Jones at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory



Stargazing Information
With the constellations of winter on their way out, the stars of spring dominate the sky for most of the night. Leo, the season's signature constellation, stands high in the south by the time the last glow of twilight fades away. Look for the backward question mark that outlines his head and mane, and the small triangle to its left that marks his tail. Virgo follows Leo across the sky. And Boötes, the herdsman, rises in the northeast, marked by yellow-orange Arcturus, one of the brightest stars in the night sky.

This Week's Stargazing Tips  http://stardate.org/nightsky

 
April 11, 2011
The first-quarter Moon sails across the southwestern quadrant of the sky this evening. It lines up with the bright "twins" of Gemini, the stars Pollux and Castor, which are to the Moon's upper right as darkness falls.

April 12, 2011
Under a dark, clear sky, you may see a couple of thousand stars. The brightest is Sirius, which is well up in the south-southwest in early evening. The faintest stars visible to the unaided eye are only about one one-thousandth as bright as Sirius.

April 13, 2011
Regulus, the brightest star of Leo, the lion, hovers close to the Moon tonight. They are high in the sky at nightfall, with the star a little to the Moon's left or upper left, and they set in the wee hours of the morning.


April 14, 2011
The Big Dipper stands high in the north late tonight, its bowl spilling its contents toward the northern horizon. Leo, the lion, stands in the southwest, while Cygnus, the swan, soars through the Milky Way in the northeast.

April 15, 2011
The Moon forms a tall, skinny wedge with the planet Saturn and the star Spica tonight. They are in the eastern sky at nightfall. Saturn looks like a bright golden star well to the lower left of the Moon, with Spica directly below Saturn.
April 16, 20
The planet Saturn shines like a bright golden star to the upper left of the Moon this evening. They are low in the sky as darkness falls, forming a beautiful triangle with the star Spica, which is to the Moon's lower left.

April 17, 2011
Spica, the brightest star of Virgo, rises above the full Moon tonight and tracks the Moon across the sky. What we see as Spica is actually two massive stars that are separated by about 10 million miles -- a fraction of the distance from Earth to the Sun.


Join the worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 campaign: March 22 - April 6

Short overview:

What: The GLOBE at Night 2011 Campaign: Less of Our Light for More Star Light

When: 8pm to 10pm local time, March 22 - April 4 northern hemisphere; March 24 - April 6 southern hemisphere

Where: Everywhere

Who: Everyone


GLOBE at Night encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of the night sky. During 2 weeks of moonless evenings, children and adults match the appearance of a constellation (Leo in the northern hemisphere and Crux or Leo in the southern hemisphere) with 7 star charts of progressively fainter stars found at www.globeatnight.org. They then submit their choice of star chart on-line with their date, time and location to help create a light pollution map worldwide.

The GLOBE at Night 2011 campaign dates are March 22 – April 4 (for the Northern Hemisphere) and March 24 – April 6 (for the Southern Hemisphere). Over 60,000 measurements have been contributed from more than 100 countries over the last 5 years of two-week campaigns, thanks to everyone who participated!

This year children and adults can submit their measurements in real time if they have a smart phone or tablet. To do this, you can use the web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time are put in automatically. And if you do not have a smart phone or tablet, there are user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page to find latitude and longitude.

Through GLOBE at Night, students, teachers, parents and community members are amassing a data set from which they can explore the nature of light pollution locally and across the globe. Please make a difference and join our efforts in 2011. For activity packets, one-page flyers and postcards advertising the campaign, visit www.globeatnight.org/pdf/.

 

More Information:

Less of Our Light for More Star Light

Join the 6th worldwide GLOBE at Night 2011 campaign: March 22 - April 6

With half of the world’s population now living in cities, many urban dwellers have never experienced the wonderment of pristinely dark skies and maybe never will. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a concern on many fronts: safety, energy conservation, cost, health and effects on wildlife, as well as our ability to view the stars. Even though light pollution is a serious and growing global concern, it can be one of the easiest environmental problems you can address through responsible lighting on local levels.

Participation in the international star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, helps to start the process of addressing the light pollution issue locally as well as globally. The campaign invites everyone all over the world to record the brightness of the night sky. The campaign runs from March 22 through April 4 in the Northern Hemisphere and March 24 through April 6 in the Southern Hemisphere. The campaign is easy and fun to do. First, you match the appearance of the constellation Leo or Crux with simple star maps of progressively fainter stars found. Then you submit your measurements, including the date, time, and location of your comparison. After all the campaign’s observations are submitted, the project’s organizers release a map of light-pollution levels worldwide. Over the last six annual 2-week campaigns, volunteers from more than 100 nations contributed over 60,000 measurements, 30% of which came from last year’s campaign.

To learn the five easy steps to participate in the GLOBE at Night program, see the GLOBE at Night website. You can listen to this year’s 10-minute audio podcast on light pollution and GLOBE at Night. Or download a 45-minute powerpoint and accompanying audio. GLOBE at Night is also on Facebook and Twitter. (See the links at the end.)

The big news is that children and adults can submit their measurements in real time if they have a smart phone or tablet. To do this, you can use the web application. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time are put in automatically. And if you do not have a smart phone or tablet, there are user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page to find latitude and longitude.

For activities that have children explore what light pollution is, what its effects are on wildlife and how to prepare for participating in the GLOBE at Night campaign, see the Dark Skies Rangers activities. Monitoring our environment will allow us as citizen-scientists to identify and preserve the dark sky oases in cities and locate areas where light pollution is increasing. All it takes is a few minutes during the 2011 campaign to measure sky brightness and contribute those observations on-line. Help us exceed the 17,800 observations contributed last year. Your measurements will make a world of difference.



Submitting Measurements: http://www.globeatnight.org/report.html

Web App for Reporting: http://www.globeatnight.org/webapp/

Stargazing Information  http://stardate.org/nightsky

or click on this link  http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/    (What's Up for March ? from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

Venus and Jupiter continue to bracket the sky as winter gives way to spring. Venus is the brilliant "morning star," low in the east before sunrise, while Jupiter is the "evening star," sliding lower in the west day by day. Little Mercury slides past Jupiter in mid-month. Leo, the lion, leaps proudly across the sky, and is in view all night. Some of the icons of winter remain in good view as well. Orion is in the southwest at nightfall, with Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, twinkling in the south.

This Week's Stargazing Tips from StarDate  http://stardate.org/nightsky

 
March 1, 2011

The Milky Way arches between Gemini and Orion this evening. To find Orion, look for the line of three bright stars that marks Orion's Belt high in the south in early evening. To find Gemini, look for a pair of even brighter stars high in the east.
March 2, 2011

If you can get away from city lights the next few nights, look high overhead for the Gegenschein, a round, faint, hazy patch of light. It's created by sunlight reflecting off grains of dust scattered between the planets of our solar system.

March 3, 2011
The Beehive, a star cluster in the constellation Cancer, appears almost directly overhead in late evening. The cluster is about 500 light-years from Earth. To the unaided eye it looks like a faint smudge of light, but binoculars reveal dozens of stars.

March 4, 2011
The Moon is new at 2:46 p.m. CST today as it crosses the line between Earth and the Sun. It is lost in the Sun's glare, but will return to view as a thin crescent in the west shortly after sunset on Sunday.

March 5, 2011

From dark skywatching locations, a faint pyramid of light glows faintly in the west after nightfall the next few evenings. This dim glow is the zodiacal light, which is sunlight reflecting off of tiny grains of dust scattered around the inner solar system.
March 6, 2011
Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, stands to the left or lower left of the crescent Moon early this evening. It looks like a dazzling cream-colored star.

March 7, 2011
The crescent Moon and the planet Jupiter line up low in the west at nightfall this evening. Jupiter looks like a brilliant star below the Moon. It is dropping lower in the sky each evening, and it will disappear in the Sun's glare by month's end.




Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Hi Parents,
As you may be aware Spring Conferences will be Thursday, March 24th from 3:30 - 8.

If you would like to request a conference please email me or write a note on paper and send it in with your child by Friday, March 4.  I will send an attached note in your child's agenda within the next two weeks.

I would like for you to give me 2-3 options as I am trying to schedule for up to 90 parents.

If we have met earlier in the year I may need to give preference to those parents with whom want to meet and I did not meet with earlier in the year.

The slots I have available at this time are:
7:30 am, 11:10 or 2:15 most days
Thursday, March 24  -  3:30-8 every 15 minutes.

February Star GazingStargazing Summary
stargazing iconAs the nights grow shorter during February, the stars of winter reign for much of the night. Beautiful Orion is in the south at nightfall, with dazzling Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, twinkling fiercely to its lower left. By late in the month, though, the stars of spring slide into better view. Leo clears the horizon by mid-evening, with Virgo trailing behind him. Venus reigns as the "morning star," while Jupiter dominates in the evening, although it slides lower in the sky each day.

More stargazing information: http://stardate.org/nightsky 
Stargazing Summary
 Hear StarDate every day on more than 360 radio stations nationwide or subscribe to our podcast: http://stardate.org/feeds/podcast.xml

February 1-6: Stellar Messengers. The stars send out countless messengers -- particles of light that carry information about the stars themselves. We'll have details. And we'll also talk about messages from deep inside the Moon.

February 7-13: Planets Galore. The population of known planets beyond our own solar system is getting a lot more interesting. It includes a world with water in its atmosphere, plus a system of at least five planets. Join us for these and many more exoplanets.

February 14-20: Machines. The night sky is filled with machines. The stars are all factories that forge chemical elements deep in their cores, for example, while a few constellations honor the machines forged by people. Join us for details this week.

February 21-27: A Changing Dipper. The Big Dipper is probably the best-known star pattern in the sky. But it won't always look like a dipper. We'll explain why. And we'll also tell you why the end of the dipper is really the leader.

February 28-March 6: Underground Astronomy. Most astronomy is conducted on high: from mountains, balloons, and spaceships. But some astronomy is conducted down low: from deep under water, under ice, and under ground. Join us this week for details on the depths of astronomy.

February Program Schedule: http://stardate.org/radio/calendars




Live Mars Science Lab Student Chat
On Thursday, January 27 students in Grade 3, 4 participated in a live Mars Science Laboratory student chat.  The chat, sponsored by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California asked for classes to submit three questions.  Two questions from our FishHawk Creek AGP students in Grades 3 and 4 were selected.  

The link can be viewed at:






Parent information session
with Judy Galbraith,
author of The Gifted Kids Survival Guide

Words of Wisdom from Gifted and Talented Youth

January 26, 2011
6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

The Children's Board of Hillsborough
1002 E. Palm Avenue
Tampa, FL  33605

Click the link for more information:Words of Wisdom Parent Session.pdf

Opening the Door to Potential


Friday, January 14, 2011
Please join us to celebrate 25 years of
environmental education at the
Manatee Viewing Center!
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Jan. 15 and 16, 2011
Radio Disney©
Arts and crafts
Children’s activities
Fun for all ages
Free parking and admission
(Additional parking located at the Apollo Beach Elementary School and
the South Shore Community Events Center)
See manatees up close when the water temperature of
Tampa Bay is 68 degrees Fahrenheit or colder!
Manatee Viewing Center
6990 Dickman Rd., Apollo Beach, FL 33572
(Follow Big Bend Road west to the end.)
Click here for directions
The center is ADA-compliant; no pets please.
Learn more about the Manatee Viewing Center
at tampaelectric.com/manatee.

January 10, 2011


I have some exciting news!  Our classes have been selected to come up with three questions for the Mars Science Lab which is going up November 25, 2011.  The questions must be submitted to me by Friday, January 14th through email by you or students may write on a piece of notebook paper and turn in.   I and my science team will  select the top three questions and send over to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory by the 20th.

JPL's Education Office is hosting a 30-minute live video chat about the rovers on Thursday, Jan. 27
Our guest will be NASA/JPL engineer Nagin Cox. Nagin is currently on the mission operations team for the Mars Science Laboratory. She was the Deputy Team Chief of the Spacecraft/Rover Engineering Flight Team for Spirit and Opportunity. In addition, Nagin spent most of 2010 looking into a future Mars mission.


I have linked all of this information onto Renzulli Learing so that students can have easy access to the sites.  I have also listed them here for your reference.
More information about the Mars Science Laboratory can be found at http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .
Highlights of the rover can be found at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2010-302 .
Information about Spirit and Opportunity can be found online at http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html .




January 8, 2011
Please find the latest update on our Earth and Space studies:

For Grade 3, students should be looking at the stars/constellations in the night sky as often as possible and noting into their Science notebook.  Your child may ask to download stellarium.org, which is a free website that I have used for several years.  The program just takes a few minutes and is just like the programs they use in the planetariums across the country.

For Grade 4, students they are starting to note the Moon Phases into a calendar located in their Science notebooks.  If students can note the time and location of the Moon (1/8 Moon is southwest high in the sky at 6PM) into their notebooks as well we will be using this data to look for patterns.  Students are becoming very well versed on the Moon phases so you should be very impressed.  Grade 4 students may also note stars/constellations that they see in the night sky.  Your child may ask to download stellarium.org, which is a free website that I have used for several years.  The program just takes a few minutes and is just like the programs they use in the planetariums across the country.


Space Weather News for Jan. 3, 2011

QUADRANTID METEOR SHOWER: Sky watchers in the northern hemisphere should be alert for meteors before sunrise on Tuesday, Jan. 4th.  Earth is about to pass through a narrow stream of debris from shattered comet 2003 EH1, the parent of the annual Quadrantid meteor shower.  Forecasters say the encounter could produce a fast flurry of 100 meteors per hour during the early hours of Jan. 4th. Details and observing tips may be found at http://spaceweather.com .

GOT CLOUDS?  No problem. You can stay inside and listen to the Quadrantids. Tune into SpaceWeather Radio for live meteor echoes from the US Air Force Space Surveillance Radar in Texas: http://spaceweatherradio.com .

PARTIAL SOLAR ECLIPSE:  After the meteor shower, observers in Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East and parts of Asia can witness a partial eclipse of the sun.  In western Europe, as much as 86% of the solar disk will be covered by the Moon at dawn, producing a fantastic crescent sunrise on Jan. 4th.  Check http://spaceweather.com for details, animated maps and live webcasts.

stargazing_2009.gifJanuary 2011   Stargazing Tips
Grade 3 and 4 students - Here is a guide for what you are viewing in the night sky for January.



Lunar Eclipse
will be visible across the United States - December 21, 2010
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/index.cfm  Great video on what to watch for.

Space Weather News for Dec. 19, 2010

LUNAR ECLIPSE:  For the first time in many years, northern winter is beginning with a total lunar eclipse.  On Dec. 21, 2010, the date of the northern winter solstice, the full Moon will pass through Earth's shadow, turning the lunar orb a delightful shade of coppery-red. Sky watchers in North America are favored with an overhead view as the eclipse unfolds on Tuesday morning between 02:41 am and 03:53 am EST. Visit http://spaceweather.com for full coverage of the event including live webcasts, observing tips, and a look at the surprising connection between lunar eclipses and Earth

Moon Phases

Great program to help one view the night sky  stellarium.org

Next Shuttle Launch
Space Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station  Thursday, February 3, 2011
This is the last flight for Discovery. One more shuttle flight  (Endeavour) on April 1, 2011+ ever!

Stargazing Information updated 11/17/10 from stardate.org


The bright constellations of winter creep into prime viewing time during the longer, cooler nights of November. Orion rises in mid-evening early in the month, but by early evening at month’s end. The brilliant ring of stars known as the Winter Circle loops around Betelgeuse, the orange star that marks Orion’s shoulder, later in the evening. The loop includes the eye of Taurus, the bull; the “twins” of Gemini; and Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.



This Week's Stargazing Tips

November 17, 2010



The Leonid meteor shower reaches its peak tonight. The view should be best in the wee hours of tomorrow morning, after the gibbous Moon sets.


November 18, 2010



The Pleiades star cluster passes high across the south at midnight. If you see the cluster out of the corner of your eye, it looks like a bright smudge of light. But look straight at it and you will see six stars that form a tiny dipper shape.


November 19, 2010



The Moon sails high across the sky tonight, illuminating the night with its icy glow. It is Earth's only natural-born satellite. Our planet may sometimes capture a passing asteroid for a few months or years, creating a temporary satellite.


November 20, 2010



The Moon will be full at 11:27 a.m. CST tomorrow. It lines up opposite the Sun as seen from Earth, so sunlight illuminates the entire lunar disk. November's full Moon is known as the Snow Moon or Frost Moon.


November 21, 2010



Aldebaran, the brightest star of Taurus, the bull, rises below the full Moon Moon early this evening and keeps close to the Moon throughout the night. Aldebaran looks orange, indicating that its surface is cooler than the surface of the Sun.


November 22, 2010



A myriad of bright stars twinkles across the sky early this evening. In the west, look for the stars of the Summer Triangle, Vega, Deneb, and Altair. Fomalhaut is low in the south, and yellow-orange Capella is low in the northeast.


November 23, 2010



The stars of winter are working their way into the evening sky. Look for them in the east beginning around 10 or 11 p.m.: Orion, the hunter; Gemini, the twins; and Canis Major, the big dog, with its "dog star" Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.



The bright constellations of winter creep into prime viewing time during the longer, cooler nights of November. Orion rises in mid-evening early in the month, but by early evening at month’s end. The brilliant ring of stars known as the Winter Circle loops around Betelgeuse, the orange star that marks Orion’s shoulder, later in the evening. The loop includes the eye of Taurus, the bull; the “twins” of Gemini; and Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.



This Week's Stargazing Tips

November 1, 2010



November evenings are good times to watch the Milky Way. It arches from east to west with a dip toward the northern horizon. You need a dark sky to see it -- a night with little or no Moon, like tonight, and a viewing location far from city lights.


November 2, 2010



The planet Saturn is in view in the east-southeast before dawn this month. It looks like a bright golden star. It is especially easy to pick out tomorrow because it stands close to the lower left of the crescent Moon.


November 3, 2010



The fingernail-thin crescent Moon has a couple of companions at first light tomorrow: the star Spica, which is just to the lower left of the Moon, and the planet Saturn, which is farther to the upper left of the Moon.


November 4, 2010



Look high in the north and east during the evening hours this month for a flattened "W" or "M" floating through the Milky Way. The letter is outlined by the five brightest stars of the constellation Cassiopeia, the queen.


November 5, 2010



The Moon is "new" at 11:52 p.m. CDT, marking its passage between Earth and Sun. Darkness cloaks the hemisphere that faces our way, so we can't see it. But the Moon will return to view as a thin crescent in the western sky on Sunday evening.


November 6, 2010



The constellation Perseus climbs high across the sky on autumn nights. Among other wonders, it is home to a beautiful red nebula whose outline resembles the state of California. It is 65 light-years long and almost 1,500 light-years from Earth.


November 7, 2010



The constellation Capricornus scoots across the southwestern quadrant of the sky tonight. It is due south at nightfall and sets by around midnight. Its brightest stars form a wide triangle that resembles the bottom of a bikini bathing suit.




Check last week's tips if you missed a day.


Conference Night is Thursday, October 28th.  Many parents have already scheduled a time.  If you need to meet with me please email me and we can set up a time.

Renzulli Learning is up and running.  Your child has received their user name and password.  I tried to make it user friendly by changing the login names to something that students can remember.  The password is your child's lunch number.  Passwords can be found in the front of the Agenda Planner or in the student Science Notebook.  For science, assignments have been posted.  Students will be going to computer  lab for 30 minutes weekly to work on this project and they can choose to work on their project from home.
Parents, please sign yourself up on Renzulli Learning as well.  You will need to have your student login name and password.  The parent icon is at the bottom of the RenzulliLearning.com website where student icon is.  As a parent you will receive information.



Next Shuttle Launch
Space Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station  Monday, November 1, 2010 4:40 pm
This is the last flight for Discovery. One more shuttle flight on February 27, 2011 ever!



AGP Open House Schedule on September 16th:

5:30- 6         Grade 3 Math Mr. Green and Grade 5 Math, Science Mr. Green
5:30 - 6        Grade 4 Math Mrs. Marshall
(6-7 Homeroom visits)
7-7:30          Grades 3, 4 Science Mrs. Vaughn

I am looking forward to meeting with you!




SMATH Project
AGP project for Grades 3 and 4

Due by Wednesday, September 22, 2010 or sooner!
Students, we would like for you to find some Summer Smath pictures.

Here are a few simple requirements:

  • Students will submit at least one pictures depicting Math, Science, or both (Smath).
  • Students will need to writeone - two Smath questions for each picture.  These are H.O.T. (Higher Order Thinking) questions that incorporate Where is the Math? Where is the Science?  Where is the Smath?
–H.O.T. Questions involve questioning in a way that will not result in a “yes or no” answer, but in a detailed response that creates deeper thinking.
  • You will need to have your pictures developed as photos or simply print out on paper.  (Please write your name on the back.)
  • Turn in by the due date. (September 22nd)
Get your parents hooked on finding the Smath!  Soon the whole family will be looking for and discussing all of the Smath around you everyday!

Visit the “Where is the Smath?”  website for more examples and responses to other students’ Smath photos!



Hello Parents and Students,

I am so looking forward to your return and thrilled to let you know that I will be servicing Grades 3 and 4 Science for the 2010-2011 school year!

Supplies needed:

Grade 3 Science Supply List
3 composition notebooks  (hard cover - no spirals)
1 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
highlighter
Crayola markers thick or thin
purple or red checking pens
1 large glue stick

Grade 4 Science Supply List
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
1 dozen pencils  (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
highlighter
colored pencils (girls)
crayons (boys)
purple or red checking pens
1 package of graph paper
1 large glue stick




July 29, 2010
Gifted Ed Funding on Verge of Elimination
Call Your Senators Today!
In the last two weeks, the House AND Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Education have voted to ELIMINATE funding for the Javits Gifted and Talented Education program, the only federal investment in gifted education
 
TODAY, Thursday (7/29), the full Senate Committee will determine whether to accept the Subcommittee's recommendation of elimination. 
 
Elimination of the Javits program will result in the loss of identifying best practices and closure of the National Research Center on Gifted Education.
 
All are urged to call their Senators ASAP!  Please feel free to use the talking points which are provided by simply entering your zip code into the box above. Please provide feedback on your calls so that we can coordinate our advocacy strategy. 
 

Questions?  Call Kim Hymes, CEC Director of Policy : 888-232-7733ext. 441.
More information on the CEC website:

Space Weather News for June 25, 2010

SPACE STATION IN CONSTANT SUNLIGHT:  For the next few days, the  International Space Station (ISS) will be orbiting Earth in constant sunlight.  This sets the stage for a remarkable sky show.  Because the ISS is constantly illuminated, it shines brightly in the night sky every single time it passes overhead.  Some observers can see the space station 3, 4, even 5 times a night.  More information and flybys predictions may be found at http://spaceweather.com

692010_80146_0.png
Congratulations to our Grade 5 FishHawk Creek Marvin the Martian team for taking first place in its division at the Planetary Lander "Egg Drop" Competition at Universal Studios on Saturday, May 29, 2010!  We are very proud of your engineering design challenge teamwork!
The competition was sponsored by Space Florida, NASA @ KSC, Universal, and the Florida Department of Education.


692010_80846_3.jpg



What's Up for June?
Tue, 01 Jun 2010 11:00:00 -0500

This month you can view a planetary necklace spanning the sky from dusk to dawn.



FREE MOSI Opportunity:

Parents and Students  FREE Hurricane Expo at MOSI. It is a great way for families to learn valuable information about how to prepare for a hurricane as well as the resources available in the community.

Date:           Saturday, May 22nd
Time:   9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Location:       Museum of Science and Industry

The family friendly event will also have caricature artists, balloon animals, face painting and moon bouncer.



Great opportunity for your students to see the Space Shuttle and Space Station!

Space shuttle Atlantis and the International Space Station are flying together 220 miles overhead until Sunday, May 23. Circling the Earth every 90 minutes, the spacecraft offer unique sighting opportunities for sky gazers around the world.



SATELLITE SIGHTING INFORMATION FOR


***** Tampa *****


THE FOLLOWING ISS SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM SUN MAY 16 TO MON MAY 31



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)














ISS

Sun May 16/10:01 PM

< 1


34

21 above NNW
34 above NNW

ISS

Mon May 17/08:51 PM

1


15

15 above NNE
15 above NE

ISS

Tue May 18/09:15 PM

3


67

27 above NNW
28 above ESE

ISS

Wed May 19/09:40 PM

2


21

15 above W
19 above SW

ISS

Thu May 20/08:32 PM

1


30

30 above SE
15 above SE

ISS

Fri May 21/08:54 PM

2


19

18 above WSW
15 above SSW













ONLY DAYS WITH SIGHTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LISTED




THE FOLLOWING SHUTTLE SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM MON MAY 17 TO WED JUN 02



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)














SHUTTLE

Mon May 17/08:51 PM

1


15

15 above NNE
15 above NE

SHUTTLE

Tue May 18/09:15 PM

3


67

27 above NNW
28 above ESE

SHUTTLE

Wed May 19/09:40 PM

2


21

15 above W
19 above SW

SHUTTLE

Thu May 20/08:32 PM

1


30

30 above SE
15 above SE

SHUTTLE

Fri May 21/08:54 PM

2


19

18 above WSW
15 above SSW













Annual Meeting
 
Saturday, May 15, 2010 
 
10:30am-noon
 
 900 North Ashley Drive Tampa, Florida 33602-3788
  
 
Please join us this Saturday to learn about the new
hands-on Glazer Children's Museum, opening this Fall,
from Sarah Cole, Director of Education. 
 
A walk to the site of the museum and BYO PICNIC LUNCH at the Curtis Hixon Park is planned following the meeting.
 
Please RSVP to Angela at rsvp@GACHFlorida.com by Friday, May 14, at 5pm.
 
We hope to see you there!
 
Stephanie Georgiades, M.A., President
GACH, Inc.




Do you dare wake Mom at dawn ... on Mother's Day? Under the circumstances, she might not mind. May 9th begins and ends with a lovely display of stars and planets.





Visit SIFT at: http://www.cpet.ufl.edu/sift/           And the Sifters Guide at:   http://www.cpet.ufl.edu/siftguide/

Tell Us About Your TV Rebellion and Win!


poe_sleep_pad.jpgDid you keep the TV off all week? Just on Earth Day? Did you garden? Take a hike? See any critters? Tell us what you did and how it felt to be screen free during your Great TV Rebellion and you may win a water bottle, sleeping pad, or camp chair (all prizes are geared for kids) from our friends at Pacific Outdoor Equipment. We will hold the drawing on May 10, so get your stories in today! Submit Your Story >



Throw a star party.
SATELLITE SIGHTING INFORMATION FOR

***** Tampa *****




THE FOLLOWING ISS SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM WED APR 28 TO THU MAY 13



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)














ISS

Wed Apr 28/08:44 PM

4


74

15 above SW
17 above NE

ISS

Thu Apr 29/04:51 AM

< 1


20

20 above E
15 above E

ISS

Thu Apr 29/09:12 PM

1


21

21 above NW
16 above N

ISS

Sat May 01/08:28 PM

< 1


18

18 above NNW
15 above N













ONLY DAYS WITH SIGHTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LISTED



 
This data last updated on 28 Apr 2010 22:09:31 GMT




SMATH Project
AGP project for Grades 3, 4, and 5

Due Tuesday, April 27, 2010 or sooner!
Students, we would like for you to take some Smath pictures on your travels next week or the following week.

Here are a few simple requirements:

  • Students will submit no more than three pictures depicting Math, Science, or both (Smath).
  • Students will need to write two Smath questions for each picture.  These are H.O.T. (Higher Order Thinking) questions that incorporate Where is the Math? Where is the Science?  Where is the Smath?
–H.O.T. Questions involve questioning in a way that will not result in a “yes or no” answer, but in a detailed response that creates deeper thinking.
  • You will need to have your pictures developed as photos or simply print out on paper.  (Please write your name on the back.)
  • Turn in by the due date. (April 27th)
Get your parents hooked on finding the Smath!  Soon the whole family will be looking for and discussing all of the Smath around you everyday!

Visit the “Where is the Smath?”  website for more examples and responses to other students’ Smath photos!

Space Weather News for April 3, 2010

SPACE SHUTTLE SKY SHOW: On Monday morning, April 5th, thousands of people gathered in Florida to witness the launch of space shuttle Discovery may get more than they bargained for. Just fifteen minutes before the shuttle takes off, the International Space Station (ISS) will fly over the launch site.  The station's path across the dawn sky takes it right past the gibbous Moon--a beautiful close encounter!  Photographers should be prepared for the ISS at 6:06 am EDT followed by Discovery's launch at 6:21 am EDT. Sky watchers with iPhones can prepare themselves by downloading our Simple Satellite Tracker (http://simpleflybys.com); it will guide you to the ISS and count down to the flyby so you can't miss it.

SUNSET PLANETS:  This is for everyone. Venus and Mercury are having a close encounter on April 3rd and 4th.  Look west at sunset to see the two bright planets beaming through the twilight only 3 degrees apart.  Sky maps, pictures and more information may be found at http://spaceweather.com   

Space Shuttle Mission: STS-131  Set for launch Monday, April 5th 6:21 am  Please see nasa.gov for the latest information.

STS-131 payload canister is raised into changeout room at the launch pad. Image above: Discovery's STS-131 payload canister is raised into the launch pad's payload changeout room. Image credit: NASA/Troy Cryder


Discovery and Crew Prepare for STS-131 Mission
Commander Alan Poindexter is set to lead the STS-131 mission to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery. Joining Poindexter will be Pilot Jim Dutton and Mission Specialists Rick Mastracchio, Clay Anderson, Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, Stephanie Wilson and Naoko Yamazaki of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Discovery will carry a multi-purpose logistics module filled with science racks for the laboratories aboard the station. The mission has three planned spacewalks, with work to include replacing an ammonia tank assembly, retrieving a Japanese experiment from the station’s exterior, and switching out a rate gyro assembly on the S0 segment of the station’s truss structure.

STS-131 will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station.





NASA Science News for March 31, 2010

The solar system's innermost planets are about to put on a beautiful show for sunset sky watchers.  (April 3rd and 4th)

FULL STORY at


11 Planets Song

Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, also known as GLOBE
Join thousands of teachers, students and families around the globe March 3-16, 2010, in a hunt for stars. Take part in this international event to observe the nighttime sky and learn more about light pollution around the world. GLOBE at Night is an easy observation and reporting activity that takes approximately 15-30 minutes to complete.
 
Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, also known as GLOBE, is a worldwide, hands-on science and education program for primary and secondary schools.
 
For more information about the event, visit http://www.globe.gov/GaN/. Please e-mail questions about this event to globeatnight@globe.gov


Thank you to all of the students and parents for making my 29th birthday so special!  Your well wishes, chocolates, teas, and gifts are much appreciated!  ( :

GOES-P is "Go" for March 4 Launch

Thursday's planned launch of the GOES-P satellite aboard a Delta IV rocket is a "go." Mission managers gave their approvals during this morning's Launch Readiness Review. Liftoff from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida is set for March 4 at 6:17 p.m. EST. The launch window extends to 7:17 p.m.

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-P, or GOES-P, is the latest in a series of meteorological satellites designed to watch for storm development and weather conditions on Earth. From its location in Earth orbit, GOES-P's state-of-the-art instrumentation will supply data used in weather monitoring, forecasting and warnings. It also will detect ocean and land temperatures, monitor space weather, relay communications and provide search-and-rescue support.

GOES-P, to be launched for NASA and NOAA, is a United Launch Alliance commercial launch for Boeing Launch Services under a Federal Aviation Administration license.


Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, also known as GLOBE
Join thousands of teachers, students and families around the globe March 3-16, 2010, in a hunt for stars. Take part in this international event to observe the nighttime sky and learn more about light pollution around the world. GLOBE at Night is an easy observation and reporting activity that takes approximately 15-30 minutes to complete.
 
Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, also known as GLOBE, is a worldwide, hands-on science and education program for primary and secondary schools.
 
For more information about the event, visit http://www.globe.gov/GaN/. Please e-mail questions about this event to globeatnight@globe.gov


Space Weather News for Feb. 19, 2010

DOUBLE FLYBY ALERT:  Space shuttle Endeavour is scheduled to undock from the International Space Station (ISS) on Friday, Feb. 19th, at 7:54 pm EST.  This sets the stage for a weekend of double flybys.  The ISS and Endeavour will be circling Earth in  mutual proximity, streaking through the night sky as distinct points of light.  The show will continue until Endeavour lands at Kennedy Space Center on Sunday, Feb. 21st, at 10:16 pm EST. Check the Simple Satellite Tracker to see if you are favored with an apparition: http://spaceweather.com/flybys


NASA  Kids’ Science Challenge!
Design a Sport for Mars and Win a Trip to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

The Kids Science Challenge, with support from NASA’s Imagine Mars Project, is asking students in grades 3 through 6 to consider what sports might be played by members of the first martian community.  Students must submit their very own ideas for a game suitable for the red planet by Feb. 28, 2010.  Winners will work with engineers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to flesh out their plans and bring their sport into reality (at least on Earth).
 
Mars scientist, Ashwin Vasavada, will work with the winning student/s.  “I don’t know what to expect,” he said.  “I imagine the ideas will be as extreme as the environment on Mars!”  Engineer, Suparna Mukherjee, said, “This is an awesome opportunity for kids to tackle a difficult challenge in a really fun way.”
 
Funded by a four-year grant from The National Science Foundation, the Kids’ Science Challenge offers elementary-school-age children the opportunity to practice real science and to work with scientists and engineers.  Over 770 students entered last year’s competition, and even more are expected to enter this year.  
 
More information about Imagine Mars:  http://imaginemars.jpl.nasa.gov  

Visit this site to find out what to look for in the night sky.

National Science Competition Searches for America's Top Young Scientist
For Grade 5 - 8 Students (posted 1/31/10)
Discovery Education and 3M announce the 2010 call for entries for the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge, the nation's premier science competition for students in grades 5-8.  Ten finalists will be selected to receive an all-expenses-paid trip to New York City to compete in the final challenge in October, where the winner will receive $50,000 in U.S. Savings Bonds, a tour of 3M's Innovation Center in St. Paul, Minn., and the title of "America's Top Young Scientist."  Entries Due in May 2010


Visit www.youngscientistchallenge.com for more information and submission guidelines.



Looking for a math website to review a skill?  Click on this link for an endless list!

      
Great Science Site - updated weekly!   http://www.sciencenewsforkids.org
What is SMath?
Your child may come home talking about SMath.  SMath is a blog invented by our math and science guys in the district.   We are trying to encourage students to see that math and science are connected all around them.  So when you are with your child ask them Where is the Math?  Where is the Science?  Where is the SMath?  
Your child may submit (through their parent)pictures and higher order thinking SMath questions to go with their picture to Mrs. Vaughn.  I will then forward them on.  Check out the website to see more.


Gifted Advocacy Council of Hillsborough, Inc.
The Right Fit: Stress Free College Planning for the Gifted Learner

1.gifDATE: Saturday, February 6, 2010
TIME: 4 - 6 pm
PROGRAM: The Right Fit: Stress Free College Planning for the Gifted Learner by Kenneth Albert

RSVP Deadline is 2/3 to Angela at rsvp@GACHFlorida.org with names of those attending

Gifted Advocacy Council of Hillsborough, Inc.
9602 Gretna Green Drive
Tampa, Florida 33626



Are you an inventor? This contest if for you!  Youth

Inventors begins 10/1/09 and ends1/27/10.  
See website for more information.  http://www.innovationexpress.org/

Tips for Keepin' Up on Math Skills from the
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics


Gifted Parents’ Workshop
“Top Ten Parent Questions”
Carolyn Coil, internationally known speaker, author, trainer, consultant and educator
Lauri Kirsch, Florida Association for the Gifted President, National Association for the Gifted Board Member, and Hillsborough County Gifted Coordinator
When:  Saturday, January 30, 2010
Time:  9:00 – 11:00 AM
Where:  Lee County Public Education Center
2855 Colonial Blvd, Fort Myers 33966
(Take Colonial Exit off I-75 toward Fort Myers at the intersection of Colonial and Metro Parkway.)
Parents, teachers, counselors of gifted learners can learn more about the unique social, academic, and emotional needs of these special children at this great workshop!
This workshop is brought to you by grant funds from the Florida Working on Gifted Issues Project (WOGI) and the Florida Association for the Gifted.
Parents please pre-register by emailing djuve@comcast.net with your name, county, and your child's grade level.

The Right Fit: Stress Free College Planning for the Gifted Learner
Saturday, February 6, 2010 4pm – 6pm
Jimmie B. Keel Regional Library
2902 West Bearss Avenue Tampa
Come get the scoop on stress free college planning using The Right Fit Program. This program will guide you through helping your child choose the right major, get into their first choice school and find the right scholarships. Find out why 2 out of 3 students don’t graduate in 4 years and learn how to avoid that statistic.

To register for this event, please reply to rsvp@GACHFlorida.org or call 727-692-5864 and include the event name, your name, phone and number in your party. Please register by January 25th to reserve your spot. You won’t want to miss this event!

Free to GACH members. Open to public; $10.00 donation payable in advance may be applied to annual GACH membership fee of $25.00 (valid through July 2010).



Space Night at
FishHawk Creek Elementary
Thursday, January 7, 2010
5:30 – 7:30 (Multi-Purpose Room)

  • Presenting will be Mr. Leslie J.  Gold from the Aerospace Education Services Project.  Mr. Gold is based out of Kennedy Space Center and will talk about the latest in space news.
  • For the second half of the evening students will work through NASA space science activities including viewing the night sky with telescopes from the Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI) !
It will be a fun evening for all!  We hope you can join us!International Space Station Sightings


THE FOLLOWING ISS SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM MON DEC 14 TO TUE DEC 29



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)










ISS

Thu Dec 24/06:59 AM

1


16

10 above N
16 above NNE

ISS

Sat Dec 26/06:08 AM

3


16

10 above N
13 above ENE

ISS

Sun Dec 27/06:30 AM

3


69

14 above NW
41 above ESE

ISS

Mon Dec 28/05:20 AM

< 1


12

12 above ENE
10 above ENE

ISS

Mon Dec 28/06:52 AM

4


20

11 above W
10 above S

ISS

Tue Dec 29/05:42 AM

< 1


38

38 above ESE
23 above ESE













ONLY DAYS WITH SIGHTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LISTED



 
This data last updated on 14 Dec 2009 23:42:14 GMT




December 11, 2009

Parents and Students,

We are on the final stretch of our Science Fair Project.
Graphs and the conclusion including final log check with a total of at leaset 12 journal entries are due December 15th.
A great website for your graphs is Create A Graph  http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/

I am looking forward to seeing your project in its final stage!  Great work everyone!
Mrs. Vaughn

Gifted Advocacy Council of Hillsborough, Inc. posted 11/11/09
D r. Deborah Ruf * is answering parent and teacher questions for this month's FGN Experts Online session.  posted 10/28/09

Send your questions to:experts@floridagiftednet.org  by tomorow, Thursday, October 28, 2009.

Be sure to check out the questions and Dr. Ruf's thoughtful answers on the FGN Forums http://floridagiftednet.org/forum/index.php 
 
Please consider having your school administrators and your own legislators do the same. 
 
 
Check out the Wavelength, July/August, 2009, the FGN e-newsletter here: http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs019/1102539685801/archive/1102637044216.html  
  

* Bio Deborah Ruf, Ph.D.

Deborah L. Ruf, Ph.D., Minneapolis, Minnesota, is a specialist in assessment and individualized interpretations and guidance for gifted children and adults. Parent of three
gifted adults, Ruf has taught, supervised, and administered in elementary through graduate school education. She is the author of articles and papers on school issues and the social-emotional adjustment of gifted children, particularly children at the highest levels of giftedness, as well as the High Ability Assessment Bulletin for the Stanford-Binet, Fifth Edition (2003, Riverside Publishing) and the award winning book 5 Levels of Gifted: School Issues and Educational Options (2005) (formerly titled Losing Our Minds: Gifted Children Left Behind). Dr. Ruf is American Mensa's Gifted Children Program Coordinator, winner of the Mensa Foundation's Intellectual Benefits Award. A national level conference presenter, researcher on Levels of Giftedness and how intellectual profile affects adjustment, Dr. Ruf also consults with adult groups on the social and emotional intelligence of their members. For more information see http://www.educationaloptions.com/ .




Gifted Advocacy Council of Hillsborough Announces  posted 10/13/09
Casting Call For Major Network Series
 
Are you the parent of a little genius??  Is your child a walking encyclopedia of knowledge?  Now casting children (ages 4-12) who are extremely bright for a new major network series from Mark Burnett Productions (cast Survivor, Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader, etc).  They are looking for children who are exceptionally advanced for their age in a very specific subject. Does your child know all there is to know about Baseball, the Presidents of the United States, English Literature, Chemistry etc.?  If so, then they want to meet you! Parents, this is your chance to let your child's genius shine.

This is a new show for a MAJOR network. They have a limited time to narrow down their candidates for the project so the sooner you respond, the better your chances are of being selected.

Please email them NOW at casting.jennifer@gmail.com  (the sooner the better!),  make sure you include your name, phone number, your child's name & age, the city you live in, a brief description of their genius and several photos of all of you.

They'd love to have a student from Florida make the show!   If you think that this would be good for your students please share the information quickly as they are already in the process of casting.
 
Thank you for supporting gifted learners in Hillsborough County,
Stephanie Georgiades, President
Gifted Advocacy Council of Florida, Inc.


Exciting NASA News!
Space and Moon Enthusiasts,  This Friday, October 9th we are impacting the Moon!!!


The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) is scheduled to impact the Moon on 10/9/09 at 7:30 am.  This impact will occur at the lunar South Pole at the crater, Cabeus.  Scientist are looking for the potential of water ice.   The upper-stage of the Cenaur rocket will be sent into the crater, Cabeus.  LCROSS will then fly into the plume of dust left by the impact, measure the properties, and then collide into the lunar surface four minutes later.  

For a 4 minute video showing how LCROSS will impact the Moon click on this link:


Astronomers and the general public on the West Coast are encouraged view.

Check out http://lcross.arc.nasa.gov/observation/amateur.htm and the attachment above for more information.

LCROSS Lunar Impact
7:31 a.m. EDT/4:31 a.m. PDT
Friday Oct. 9

A live NASA TV Broadcast is planned for the LCROSS impacts starting at 6:15 a.m. EDT/3:15 a.m. PDT, Oct. 9, on NASA TV and www.nasa.gov/ntv.

  • The 1.5 hour broadcast includes:
  • Live footage from spacecraft camera
  •  Real-time telemetry based animation
  •  Views of LCROSS Mission and Science Operations
  •  Broadcast commentary with expert guests
  •  Prepared video segments
  •  Views of the public impact viewing event at NASA Ames
  •  Possible live footage from the University of Hawaii, 88-inch telescope on Mauna Kea.
  • The live LCROSS Post-Impact News Conference will be 10 a.m. EDT/7 a.m. PDT on NASA TV and www.nasa.gov/ntv.


Are you an inventor? This contest if for you!  Youth

Inventors begins 10/1/09 and ends1/27/10.  
See website for more information.  http://www.innovationexpress.org/



Do you want to attend Space Camp in Huntsville Alabama?  Here is your chance!
There is a great opportunity for students age 9- 18 years old. Any students that may be interested in Space Camp, Aviation Challenge-Survival, or X-Camp, there are full Scholarships available from the Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Scholarship categories include: Academic Achievement, Financial Need, Special Needs and General Entry. The deadline for applications is December 11, 2009.

Applications and more information can be found at http://www.spacecamp.com/details.php?cat=Scholarships&program=Scholarships






Thank you to everyone who came!  
Open House for Grades 3, 4, and 5 AGP Parents

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Grade 3 –  5:00-5:30 (Mrs. Vaughn - Room 310)
Grade 4 –  5:00-5:30  (Mr. Green – Room 308)
Grade 5 – 4:30-5:00  (Mrs. Vaughn and Mr. Green – Room 310)


Thank you to our homeroom Moms:


AGP Grade 3 Mrs. Purvis has graciously accepted the volunteer position. Thank you Mrs. Purvis!
AGP Grade 5  Mrs. Kinney has graciously accepted for the third year.  We appreciate you!  Thank you!



Hello Parents and Students!

I am so looking forward to your return!

I will be servicing Grades 3 Math and Science and Grade 5 Science for the 2009-2010 school year!

Supplies needed:

Grade 3 Supply List
4 composition notebooks  (hard cover - no spirals)
1 plastic red folder
1 homework folder - your choice - just needs two pockets
1 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
highlighter
Crayola markers (24 count)

Grade 5 Supply List
3 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
1 dozen pencils  (#2)
2 pink Pearl brand erasers
highlighter
colored pencils (girls)
crayons (boys)





Send your name to Mars!

NASA invites you to submit your name to be included on a microchip that will be sent to Mars as part of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, scheduled to launch in 2011. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or still is, an environment able to support microbial life.

See link below:

Happy 4th of July to all!
Please look for the ISS over the July 4th weekend!

Michael Curie
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
 
Kelly Humphries
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111
 

June 30, 2009
 
RELEASE : 09-151
 
 
Space Station Appearing Nationwide Over July 4 Weekend
 
 
HOUSTON -- As America celebrates its 233rd birthday this holiday weekend, there will be an extra light in the sky along with the fireworks. Across the country, Americans will be treated to spectacular views of the International Space Station as it orbits 220 miles above Earth.

Many locations will have unusually long sighting opportunities of as much as five minutes, weather permitting, as the station flies almost directly overhead.

To find out when to see the station from your city, visit:





The largest spacecraft ever built, the station also is the most reflective. It will be brighter than most stars at dawn and dusk, appearing as a solid, glowing light, slowly traversing the predawn or evening sky. It is visible when lit by the sun while the ground below is not in full daylight. It moves across the sky too fast for conventional telescopes, but a good set of binoculars can enhance the viewing experience, even revealing some detail of the station's structure.

The station circles Earth every 90 minutes. It is 357 feet long, about the length of a football field including the end zones, and 45 feet tall. Its reflective solar arrays are 240 feet wide, a wingspan greater than that of a jumbo jet, and have a total surface area of more than 38,000 square feet.

An international crew of six astronauts, including American flight engineer Michael Barratt, is aboard the complex conducting research and continuing its assembly. Other crew members are from Russia, Europe, Canada and Japan.

For more information about the station, visit:

Hi Students!
Need a challenge for the Summer?  
-Check out these enriching math problems and games  
Solutions will be posted in July!


Time 4 Learning


Win Prizes by Doing Our Activities. Take the Summer Activity Challenge!



A Dictionary of Units of Measurements



SATELLITE SIGHTING INFORMATION FOR

Mail this sighting to a friend.



International Space Station Sightings for***** Tampa *****









THE FOLLOWING ISS SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM FRI JUN 26 TO SAT JUL 11



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)














ISS

Sun Jul 05/10:15 PM

< 1


11

11 above SW
11 above SW

ISS

Mon Jul 06/09:05 PM

5


22

10 above S
10 above ENE

ISS

Mon Jul 06/10:41 PM

4


15

10 above W
10 above N

ISS

Tue Jul 07/09:29 PM

6


63

10 above SW
10 above NE

ISS

Wed Jul 08/05:32 AM

5


40

11 above NNW
12 above ESE

ISS

Wed Jul 08/09:58 PM

< 1


12

12 above NNW
11 above N

ISS

Thu Jul 09/05:57 AM

5


31

10 above WNW
11 above SSE

ISS

Fri Jul 10/04:48 AM

3


43

41 above NNE
10 above ESE

ISS

Fri Jul 10/09:11 PM

< 1


13

13 above NNW
10 above N






Stargazing Summary
stargazing iconMany of June’s best skywatching treats congregate in the morning sky, including four of the five planets visible to the unaided eye: Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Mercury. Jupiter rises first and is visible through most of the post-midnight hours, with the other three peeking into view not too long before first light. The Moon sweeps past them around the summer solstice, livening up the hours before and during dawn.

Weekly Stargazing Tips: http://stardate.org/nightsky/weekly.php Stargazing Summary
 Hear StarDate every day on more than 360 radio stations nationwide. Or subscribe to our podcast and RSS feed. 

June 1-7: The serpent bearer. Ophiuchus is the zodiac’s forgotten constellation. But we haven’t forgotten it, and we’ll tell you about some of its wonders. And we’ll also tell you about the Moon and the heart of the scorpion..

June 8-14: Destination Saturn. A big spacecraft with a big mission arrived at the Saturn system five years ago, and it’s still going strong. We’ll fill you in. And we’ll also scratch into a connection between the Sun and your fingernails.

June 15-21: The Red Planet. Mars has been lurking in the Sun’s glare for months, but it’s climbing into view in the early morning sky. We’ll tell you how to find Mars, and fill you in on some recent findings about the planet.

June 22-28: Tiny black holes. The Big Bang may have forged countless black holes. They’re smaller than an atom, but as heavy as a mountain. We’ll have details on these tiny black holes, plus efforts to find them -- or to make them.
NASA's The Space Place

The Space Place, NASA’s award-winning Web site for kids, presents the Space Place cartoon kids hosting their own talk show “live” from the Space Place Clubhouse. Their guests are NASA scientists and engineers. The goal of “Space Place Live!” is to introduce kids to the human, down-to-Earth side of real scientists and engineers working in the space program. Each guest is presented as a passionate and accomplished role model for every child interested in science or engineering.
 
In the latest episode, the kids interview a cartoon version of the GOES satellite Deputy Project Manager, Andre Dress. Andre works at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. He talked with Kate and Kyo about preparing the new GOES-O weather satellite and the team for the most exciting day of the mission, the launch!
 
To watch the latest episode and past episodes that have been archived, visit http://spaceplace.nasa.gov.
 
Questions about Space Place should be emailed to spaceplace@jpl.nasa.gov.




NASA 2009 Launches
for more up to date information log onto nasa.gov and click on launches




Date: June 13 +
Mission: STS-127
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Endeavour
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Launch Time: 7:17 a.m. EDT +
Description: Space shuttle Endeavour will deliver the exposed facility of Japan's Kibo laboratory to the International Space Station.

Date: June 17
Mission: LRO/LCROSS
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station - Launch Complex 41
Description: LRO will launch with the objectives to finding safe landing sites, locate potential resources, characterize the radiation environment and test new technology. The Lunar CRater Observing and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, mission is seeking a definitive answer about the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed crater at either the Moon's North or South Pole.

Date: June 26 *
Mission: GOES-O
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station - Launch Pad 37-B
Launch Window: 6:14 - 7:14 p.m. EDT
Description: NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are actively engaged in a cooperative program, the multi-mission Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite series N-P. This series will be a vital contributor to weather, solar and space operations, and science.

Date: Aug. 6 +
Mission: STS-128
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Discovery
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Description: Space shuttle Discovery will use a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to carry experiment and storage racks to the International Space Station.

Date: Aug 17 *
Mission: STSS Demonstrators Program - Missile Defense Agency
Launch Site: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station - Launch Complex 17, Pad B
Description: STSS Demonstrators Program is a midcourse tracking technology demonstrator and is part of an evolving ballistic missile defense system. STSS is capable of tracking objects after boost phase and provides trajectory information to other sensors and interceptors. To be launched by NASA for the Missile Defense Agency.

Date: Late August +
Mission: Ares I-X Flight Test
Launch Vehicle: Ares I-X
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39B
Description: The Ares I-X flight test is NASA's first test for the Agency's new Constellation launch vehicle -- Ares I. The Ares I-X flight will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I.

Stargazing Summary
stargazing iconSpring, the season of renewal and rebirth, brings a renewed energy to evening skywatching as well. Leo and Virgo, with their luminaries Regulus and Spica, climb high overhead. Hercules lumbers into view in the northeast. And by late evening, the Summer Triangle is pushing into view, heralding the approach of the hot nights of summer. Three of the five naked-eye planets — Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus — are in good view, with Mars struggling to free itself from the dawn twilight. Its proximity to brilliant Venus will help you pick it out.


International Space Station





THE FOLLOWING ISS SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM MON MAY 11 TO SAT MAY 23



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)














ISS

Mon May 11/08:44 PM

5


64

11 above SW
11 above NE

ISS

Tue May 12/04:50 AM

2


38

38 above ENE
10 above ESE

ISS

Tue May 12/09:14 PM

< 1


13

13 above NNW
10 above N













ONLY DAYS WITH SIGHTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LISTED




THE FOLLOWING SHUTTLE SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM TUE MAY 12 TO SUN MAY 24



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)














SHUTTLE

Sat May 23/05:45 AM

4


19

12 above SSW
11 above ESE

SHUTTLE

Sun May 24/05:03 AM

1


16

16 above SSE
11 above ESE













ONLY DAYS WITH SIGHTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LISTED



































 





















A Must See Sunday evening, April 26th, 2009!

On Sunday evening, April 26th, 2009 look for the Moon.  You will see the the crescent Moon, Mercury and the Pleiades star cluster.  Click the link for more information.http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/24apr_eveningsky.htm?list901671

On Sunday evening, look for the Moon.  You will see the the crescent Moon, Mercury and the Pleiades star cluster.  Click the link above for more information.
April McDonald Sky Observatory Tips -

The Moon is in particularly fine form this month. It stages close encounters with all five of the naked-eye planets -- Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn -- as well as the stars Regulus and Antares. On the morning of the 13th it will cover up Antares as seen from Hawaii and parts of Mexico, and on the 22nd it will cover up Venus as seen from most of the continental United States. The Moon even cooperates for the Lyrid meteor shower; at the shower's peak, the Moon is a thin crescent in the pre-dawn sky, so there's little moonlight to interfere with the show.


NAME THE MARS ROVER!  
Hurry You only have until March 29th.  
Please see link below and pass onto your friends!


NASA has posted online nine rover names that are finalists for the agency's Mars Science Laboratory mission and invite the public to vote for its favorite. The non-binding poll to help NASA select a name will accept votes through March 29, 2009.

More than 9,000 students in kindergarten through 12th grades submitted essays proposing names for the rover in a nationwide contest that ended Jan. 25, 2009. Entries came from all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the families of American service personnel overseas. NASA will select the winning name, based on a student's essay and the public poll, and announce the name in April.

The student who submitted the winning name will be invited to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to sign the rover. Additionally, all 30 student semi-finalists in the naming contest will have an opportunity to place an individually-tailored message on a microchip that will be carried on the car-sized robotic explorer. For worldwide participation beyond the contest, the public has a chance to participate in "Send Your Name to Mars." The agency will collect names to be recorded on the chip. Names will be collected via the contest Web link beginning today.

Scheduled to launch in 2011 and land on Mars in 2012, the rover will use a set of advanced science instruments to check whether the environment in a selected landing region ever has been favorable for supporting microbial life and preserving evidence of such life. The rover also will search for minerals that formed in the presence of water and look for chemical building blocks of life.

To view the nine finalist names and cast your vote, visit http://marsrovername.jpl.nasa.gov.

     March 26, 2009


    Dear Parents/Guardians:

    Today we celebrated Earth Hour at school from 1 – 2 p.m.  Our class joined with other
     classes from across the district and turned off the power in our classroom for one hour.  

     Earth Hour, is a campaign (created by the World Wildlife Federation) encouraging people to
     turn off unneeded lights on March 28, 2009, 8:30 - 9:30 p.m., to make a global statement of
     concern about climate change.  The official Earth Hour is this Saturday, March 28, from
     8:30 – 9:30 p.m. EDT.  To find out more information, you can go to the following websites:

        
    I hope you will spend some time with your child this weekend to review the packet about
    Earth Hour and talk about the importance of taking care of our environment.


    Thank you for your support of our class and our Earth.


    Mrs. Vaughn


Discovery Lifts Off For a video of the STS-119 March 15th launch to the ISS please click below or visit NASA.gov


  • Shuttle heads to the International Space Station.

  •  



 NASA Announces Shuttle Prelaunch Events And Countdown Details  
 
 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Media briefings, events and operating hours for the news center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center are set for the upcoming launch of space shuttle Discovery. The STS-119 mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to lift off at 9:20 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, March 11.


Kepler Lifts Off!
Sun, 08 Mar 2009 23:00:00 -0500


The spectacular nighttime launch of a Delta II rocket carrying the Kepler planet-hunting spacecraft lifted off on time at 10:49 p.m. EST from Launch Complex...



Wed, 25 Feb 2009 23:00:00 -0600

Launch of NASA's Kepler telescope is targeted for no earlier than Friday, March 6, from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. There are two launch windows, from 10:49 - 10:52 p.m. and 11:13 - 11:16 p.m. EST.
NASA Science News for February 20, 2009

Are there other worlds like ours? Are we alone? NASA's Kepler spacecraft is about to begin an unprecedented journey that could ultimately answer these ancient questions.

FULL STORY at  



Calling all Inventors:

Innovation Youth Inventor Contest:  large postcards went home via your child's homeroom teacher today 2/17.  Students are highly encouraged to submit their idea for a new and original invention or or improvement or change to something that has already been invented.

 Contest submissions must be mailed or can be dropped off at the Learning Express on Lithia Pinecrest and Bloomingdale near Stein Mart  by March 11th.  See website for more details!  Good luck to all!
Inspiring Invention Websites




Click to view


Click to view


Click to view









Parents,
Please mark your calendar for Saturday, February 21st 10-12.  Flyers will be going home the week of February 2nd.
The Gifted Advocacy Council of Hillsborough (GACH) is sponsoring an event, "Raising Happy and Successful Gifted Children" on Saturday, February 21, at Independent Day School.  WWW.GACHFLORIDA.ORG       Independent Day School, C o r b e t t   C am p u s,  1 2 0 1 5 O r a n g e Gr o v e D r . Tam p a

Bill Nye will be at USF  February 17th at 7PM.  Tickets can be purchased starting February 3rd via Ticketmaster either online or at the ticket counter in the Marshall Student Center at USF. Ticketmaster accepts ONLY debit/credit payments. Please let us know if you have any further questions. We look forward to seeing you at the event!

Mexican Jumping Beans sites:









The biggest, fullest moon of the year will occur Saturday, January 10th.  Please click on the link to learn more.


Stargazing Summary

For Stargazing Tips click on the links below:
stargazing iconThree planets are at or near their best this month — one in the evening sky, one in the morning, and one visible almost all night. Venus dominates the evening, shining as the “evening star.” Mercury, which is the only planet closer to the Sun than Venus is, peeks into view in the east a little before sunrise. Mars and Jupiter are climbing up behind it, and may just become visible by month’s end. Saturn, which is the most-distant planet that’s easily visible to the unaided eye, rises in early evening and stays in view all night. The wide spread ensures that at least one planet is in view throughout the night.

Stargazing Summary
stargazing iconSkywatchers willing to brave the cold air on January nights will be rewarded with such memorable sights as majestic Orion climbing high across the south, trailed by Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky. Orion's shoulder, orange Betelgeuse, is the hub of the Winter Circle, a great loop of bright stars. These astronomical luminaries twinkle fiercely through the nippy night air.
Weekly Stargazing Tips: http://stardate.org/nightsky/weekly.php 


Space Weather News for Dec. 21, 2008

URSID METEORS: Earth is passing through a stream of debris from comet 8P/Tuttle and this is causing the annual Ursid meteor shower.  Forecasters expect the Ursids to peak on Dec. 22nd with 8 to 10 meteors per hour flying out of the constellation Ursa Minor (the Little Dipper) not far from the north star.  The display is usually mild, but outbursts of Ursids occasionally surprise observers with rates many times normal. The last time this happened was in 2006.

Standing outdoors to watch Ursids in December can be a chilling experience. So why not stay inside and listen? Spaceweather.com is broadcasting live audio from the Air Force Space Surveillance Radar in Texas. When a meteor passes over the facility--"ping"--there is an echo. Because the Ursid radiant is circumpolar (always up) over the radar, the echoes may be heard at any hour, night or day.
Tune in to http://spaceweather.com to try the audio feed, which can support 1000 simultaneous listeners.



Solstice Time

The precise moment of the 2008 solstice will be Sun., Dec. 21, 7:04 AM EST (12:04 UT).



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Throw a star party.

SATELLITE SIGHTING INFORMATION FOR


***** Tampa *****


THE FOLLOWING ISS SIGHTINGS ARE POSSIBLE FROM WED DEC 10 TO MON DEC 22



SATELLITE


LOCAL


DURATION


MAX ELEV


APPROACH


DEPARTURE




DATE/TIME


(MIN)


(DEG)


(DEG-DIR)


(DEG-DIR)










ISS

Thu Dec 11/06:11 PM

5


33

10 above WNW
10 above SSE

ISS

Wed Dec 17/06:27 AM

5


41

10 above SSW
11 above ENE

ISS

Fri Dec 19/05:47 AM

4


53

24 above SSW
12 above NE

ISS

Sat Dec 20/06:15 AM

3


25

25 above NW
10 above NNE

















ONLY DAYS WITH SIGHTING OPPORTUNITIES ARE LISTED



 
This data last updated on 10 Dec 2008 19:55:01 GMT


Watch the Moon on Friday, December 12!  
Not all full Moons are the same. This Friday's is the biggest and brightest full Moon of the year.

FULL STORY at


http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1862240,00.html  Click on the link to find out when and where you can see Jupiter, Venus, and the Moon together.

Space Shuttle Endeavour is ready for landing on Sunday, November 30th @1:18p.m. here in Florida at Kennedy Space Center Landing Facility.


"NASA Invites Students to Name New Mars Rover
WASHINGTON -- NASA is looking for the right stuff, or in this case, the right name for the next Mars rover."

Please find the links below for a great and very relative writing opportunity!

Students may research using the site below.  I will handing out the submission form within the next few weeks!


MARS ROVER NAMING CONTEST
Submit Your Essay between: 11/18/2008 - 1/25/2009
You must be a student in grades K-12 in the United States, including U.S. possessions and schools operated by the U.S. for children of American personnel overseas.


Space Shuttle Endeavour is ready for landing on Sunday, November 30th @1:18p.m. here in Florida at Kennedy Space Center Landing Facility.
Space Shuttle Endeavour is ready for take off for it 27th flight to the International Space Station!  Space Shuttle Endeavour will be lifting off Friday, November 14th at 7:55 PM from Kennedy Space Center.
Your students and family are highly encouraged to watch the Eastern skies!

First Rocket Parts Of NASA's New Launch System Arrive In Florida
Mon, 03 Nov 2008 23:00:00 -0600

Just a reminder - The National Association of Gifted Children is having their conference this upcoming week October 30th - November 2nd at the Tampa convention center.  I hope to see you there!
Please visit NAGC.org to register and for more information.

Wed, 29 Oct 2008 23:00:00 -0500

NASA managers completed a review Thursday of space shuttle Endeavour's readiness for flight and selected the official launch date for the STS-126 mission

Parents. please share the November 14th Space Shuttle Launch STS 126 mission is a go with your child as I will be off at the NAGC conference and will not be able to tell them.

Wed, 29 Oct 2008 23:00:00 -0500

NASA managers have announced that they will not meet a February 2009 launch date for the fifth and final shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope.



NASA Science News for October 28, 2008

The planets are gathering for spooky sunset sky show on Oct. 31st. Read today's story to find out where to look.

FULL STORY at



NASA's Space Shuttle Atlantis Rolls Off Launch Pad Monday


Mon, 13 Oct 2008 23:00:00 -0500

Space shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll back from Launch Pad 39A to the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday, Oct. 20, to await launch on its mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope.

What's Up For the Month of October?

Click the link to find out how you can see Mercury(just after sunset), Venus, and Jupiter in the in the night skyduring the month of October.

Mon, 13 Oct 2008 11:00:00 -0500
This month we have a trick -- and a treat!

NASA Science News for October 7, 2008

Yesterday, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft flew past Mercury, capturing high-resolution images of the innermost planet's previously unseen landscape. Amazing first photos are arriving at Earth now.

FULL STORY at



CHINESE SPACE LAUNCH: China's Shenzhou 7 spacecraft carrying a 3-man crew lifted off today from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center and is now in Earth orbit. During the upcoming three-day mission, Chinese astronauts, called taikonauts, will launch a small satellite and conduct their country's first space walk. As they orbit Earth, Shenzhou 7 and the body of the rocket that launched it will be visible to the naked eye from many parts of the globe. Check the Satellite Tracker for viewing times: http://spaceweather.com/flybys .
(Note: Frequent checks are recommended; predictions may change as the orbit is adjusted and estimates of orbital elements improve.)

Sighting reports and updates will be posted on http://spaceweather.com

Sign up for free Space Weather News bulletins:

You are subscribed to the Space Weather mailing list, a free service of Spaceweather.com.   To unsubscribe click here: http://www.spaceweather2.com/u?id=901672Q&n=T&l=spaceweather or send a blank email to leave-spaceweather-901672Q@www.spaceweather2.com



Space Shuttles Atlantis and Endeavor are both on launch pads 39A and 39B!


MEDIA ADVISORY : M08-177
 
 
NASA's Kennedy Space Center Holds Unique Media Event, TCDT
 
 
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- For the first time since July 2001, two space shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

On Saturday, Sept. 20, media are invited to capture a unique opportunity with both shuttles Atlantis and Endeavour on their respective pads with the rotating service structures rolled back from the vehicles. The structures provide protection from the element and access to the shuttles.

A photo opportunity will be available from 8 to 9:30 a.m. EDT, allowing media to take imagery from several locations near Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A and Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B.

A live static shot of the two shuttles will be available on NASA Television from 6:30 to 9:30 a.m. Video b-roll of the shuttles, including aerial shots, will be available on the NASA TV Video File. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit:

AGP Open House

thank you to everyone who attended Open House on Tuesday.  Your chidlren are awesome!
Thank you for all of the classroom donations!  They are much appreciated!

Respectfully,
Mrs. Vaughn



Space Weather News for Sept. 12, 2008

HARVEST MOON:  This weekend's full Moon has a special name--the Harvest Moon. It's the full Moon closest to the northern autumnal equinox. In years past, farmers depended on the light of the Harvest Moon to gather ripening crops late into the night. Post-Edison, we appreciate it mainly for its beauty. Be alert in the nights ahead for Harvest Moon halos, coronas and 'dogs. Visit http://spaceweather.com for example and more information.






Notice to all parents of gifted children...

THE GIFTED ADVOCACY COUNCIL
OF HILLSBOROUGH, INC.
PRESENTS


ELIZABETH SHAUNESSY, Ph.D.

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN THE DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
COORDINATOR OF THE GIFTED EDUCATION PROGRAM

“SUPPORTING THE SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL NEEDS OF GIFTED LEARNERS”

Saturday, September 20, 2008, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Including a Question and Answer Session
Independent Day School – Corbett Campus
12015 Orange Grove Blvd.
Tampa, Fl 33618




Free Admission/Parents and Educators Welcome – Please RSVP by 9/13/08 to:  Programs@GACHFlorida.org

A GACH Board of Directors Meeting will immediately follow the presentation; all GACH members are welcome to attend.  For more information on GACH, Inc., please visit www.GACHFlorida.org.
Our mission is to promote and support a high quality education for gifted students, to inform and unite parents of gifted students in Hillsborough County, and to advocate on behalf of gifted students.









792008_102749_1.jpg2008-06-17 Space Camp 114.jpg2008-06-17 Space Camp 129.jpg

Hi Everyone!

I have safely returned back to Earth from Space Camp sponsored by Honeywell at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville!  What a phenominal experience and I have many lessons involving math, science, and technology to share. I  even received an official flight suit!      
Hope you are having a fun summer!  See you in August!
Mrs. Vaughn

Space Weather News for July 3, 2008

WEEKEND SKY SHOW: Saturn, Mars and a slender crescent Moon are gathering together for a pretty sunset sky show over the 4th of July weekend.  For people in the USA celebrating Independence Day, it's a bit of heavenly charm among the smoke and flash of evening fireworks.  Check http://spaceweather.com for the full story and sky maps.

EARTH AT APHELION: On the 4th of July, you will be farther from the sun than at any other time of the year. Earth's orbit around the sun is not a perfect circle, it's an ellipse, and on July 4th, Earth is at the end of the ellipse farthest from the sun. Astronomers call this "aphelion." When we are at aphelion, the sun appears slightly smaller in the sky (by about 1.7%) and global solar heating is actually a little less (by about 3.5%) than the yearly average. This provides scant relief from northern summer heat, however.  Today's edition of http://spaceweather.com explains why.


NASA Science News for July 1, 2008

Look beyond the fireworks on 4th of July weekend. A trio of worlds is converging for a pretty sunset sky show.

FULL STORY at


Check out our RSS feed at http://science.nasa.gov/rss.xml!

Have an awesome Summer everyone!  Thank you to everyone for all of your thoughtful gifts!

Kapla is coming to MOSI
On Friday, June 13  Kapla will be at the Dinosaur opening.  If you are a MOSI member you will be able to visit the MOSI exhibit from 4-8!

Riverdeep/Destination Math Logon

username:  student 6 digit number (same as lunch number)
password:  2 digit month 4 digit birth year  (Example March 1996  031996)

Breaking News

We are pleased to announce that the family edition of the Renzulli Learning System (RLS) is now available from the American Institute For Foreign Study.  A photo of the home page is attached and you can access the web site by going to http://www.giftedstudy.com/renzulli

Please share this information with parents who you think might be interested in obtaining a profile of their children’s strengths and in providing their children with the more than 20,000 enrichment resources and activities that are available through the RLS.

.

                        
































































        


The two brightest planets are converging for a Kbeautiful close encounter on Friday morning, February 1st. It's a sky show you won't want to miss.

FULL STORY at


Kapla Builders

For all of those Kapla fans here are some websites to visit.

                A Japanese website where you can build online

        This link features a Swiss teenager (only 15 years old) who is                  an incredible builder


        The Kapla planks may be found at Target or                                      kaplatoys.com.



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Daylight Saving Time

        Don't forget to set your clocks back on Sunday,                                 November 4!

        Daylight Savings Time (DST) was started to allow people                 and businesses to use daylight more effectively.  Turning               the clocks back in the fall and ahead in the spring helps               conserve energy.

        The idea originated from none other than Benjamin                       Franklin!  In 1784 Ben Franklin proposed this idea as an                American delegate in Paris to the French so that they                   could conserve energy and make better use of daylight.                  Paris will change its time next Sunday.

        Presently, in the United States the clocks are always                   turned back on the last Sunday of October and then                      turned forward on the first Sunday in April.

        

                































Science Fair Boards are Selling Fast!
Grade 3 only
Wednesday, October 10
We will be selling science fair project boards starting Monday, 10/12 for $1.75 each. This is the at cost price. The boards  will sell fast and will be sold on a first paid first get basis. Your child will be receiving an order form to take home from their homeroom teacher.  
Please turn in all monies to your child's homeroom teacher soon!

Conference Nights

If you are interested in a conference and were not able to sign up at Open House please email me.  I have been having conferences with all interested parents for several weeks after school to accomodate everyone.

Wednesday, October 17 & Thursday, October 18  4- 6:30 p.m.




 








 


















Welcome Back Everyone!

Open House
Thursday, September 20th
Science Fair Information
5 - 6PM  (Media Center)
A must for all Grade 3-5 parents.

Intermediate AGP Open House -
6:30 -7

Primary AGP Open House
7-7:30

Space Weather News for Aug. 27, 2007

LUNAR ECLIPSE--FULL COVERAGE: On Tuesday, Aug. 28th, the full Moon will enter Earth's shadow for a 90-minute total eclipse. People on the Pacific side of Earth will have the best view as the Moon turns a dreamy shade of sunset red. Favored areas include the Americas (especially western North America), Hawaii, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, east Asia and Antarctica.  The show begins Tuesday morning around 2 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (0900 UT).

Although the dominant color of a lunar eclipse is red, sometimes another hue appears--turquoise.  Earth's shadow has a turquoise-colored fringe caused by our planet's ozone layer, and this can be seen for a few beautiful moments at the onset of totality. Today's edition of spaceweather.com shows you what the turquoise fringe looks like and explains how to catch it.

Also, amateur astronomers are encouraged to assist NASA during the eclipse by scanning the darkened Moon for explosions caused by Helion meteoroid impacts. Typical flashes reach 6th magnitude--easy targets for mid-sized backyard telescopes equipped with digital video cameras. The eclipse is a great time to look for these "lunar meteors." Observing tips and more information are available at http://spaceweather.com.


On Tuesday morning, Aug. 28th, a team of astronomers and engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center will attempt something never done before--to observe meteoroids hitting the Moon and exploding during a lunar eclipse. This will allow them to explore an elusive and mysterious population of "Helion" meteoroids coming from the direction of the sun.

FULL STORY at


I am so excited that August 20th has arrived.

For Primary AGP this year I am just requesting 2 composition notebooks per student.  (These are the hard cover notebooks without the spirals.)  I have many red folders left from last year that are like new so unless you feel that you need a new one I can recycle them.  Grades 1 and 2 need a homework folder and if everyone can send in a dozen #2 pencils and 2 pink erasers this should keep us set for at least a few  months. ( :  Thank you!

Primary AGP School Supply List
2 composition notebooks (hard cover - no spirals)
1 plastic red folder (optional if you have one from last year)
1 homework folder - your choice - just needs 2 pockets
                                (Grades 1 and 2 only)
1 dozen pencils (#2)
2 pink erasers

Florida Gifted Network

The Florida Association of the Gifted (FLAG) annual conference is coming to TAMPA on October 12 & 13.  This a great opportunity for parents to learn more about Gifted Education.  Please let me know if you are interested in attending and I will get you more information.

Upcoming Speaker Opportunity for Parents of Gifted Students

The Gifted Advocacy Council of Hillsborough, Inc
Presents:
Terry Stetson Wilson
Director of the Florida Gifted Network
Gifted Education in Florida: An Update
September 15, 2007
9:30am-noon
at
MAACCFFAARRLLAANNEE PARK MAGNET SCHOOL FOR
IIINTERNATIIIONAL STUDIIIES
1721 N... MACDIIILL AVENUE,,, TAMPA,,, FL 33607
Please join GACH, Inc. as we learn about recent and historical developments
in gifted education in Florida. Terry Wilson, Director of the Florida Gifted
Network (formerly called PALS) since 1991 and longtime advocate for
gifted learners, will discuss issues and events influencing gifted education in
Florida. Topics will include the current OPPAGA study, the recently
proposed revision to Florida’s gifted identification rule, and how parents and
teachers can appropriately advocate on these vital issues that will affect our
children’s education. Additional information on this remarkable speaker is
There is no charge to attend but please RSVP by September 8. You may register on line
on the GACH website at http://GACHFlorida.org, or mail the registration slip below to
GACH, Inc., 9602 Gretna Green Drive, Tampa, FL 33626.
Name: _________________________________________ Number Attending: _______
Address: _______________________________________________________________
Phone: ________________________ E-mail: __________________________________
Kapla Builders

For all of my Summer Camp Creative Building students and Kapla fans here are some websites to visit.

A Japanese website where you can build online.



This link features a Swiss teenager (only 15 years old) who is an incredible builder



FROM THE ST. PETE TIMES
April 17, 2007
It's not over
Advocates for gifted education aren't sitting by passively waiting for lawmakers to iron out an agreement on how to fund high school gifted students. They've taken a closer look at what the Senate has done, and they're none too pleased. While they thought they were getting a cap on the money, what they're reading in the Senate bill is no guarantee money that high school gifted kids would get any funding at all. So they're still pushing, but for the House version of events that retains "gifted" under the exceptional education umbrella, freezes (not eliminates) funding at this year's level, and calls for OPPAGA to review the state of the gifted education budget. To read the Florida Gifted Network's full analysis and alert, click here.
Posted by Jeff Solochek at 11:14:08 AM on April 17, 2007 in Gifted Education | Permalink | Comments (0) April 12, 2007

High School Gifted Program Funding to be Studied

Florida Gifted Network
UPDATE - April 12, 2007
Hang in there ---- we're making progress, but we are not finished yet.
Look for another update or Call To Action soon.
****************************************
Here is a good article which explains most of what's been going on the past few days:
**************************************
SENATE BILL
The Senate did their third reading today and as expected, SB 1046 passed with no changes from what we've been seeing since 7pm Tuesday night.
Changes from the original bill that we’ve been working off of for the past few weeks include:
- deleted all of the language which took gifted high school students out of the definition of "exceptional students" in statute 1003.01. Thank you, Senators.
- added language to the Guaranteed Allocation (GA) (in statute 1011.62) which places a freeze on funding for gifted in grades 9 – 12,
- adds language in the GA statute that FGN is concerned about. *
- made the intent known on the floor (but not in the bill) that they want OPPAGA to study the issues before the 2008 Legislative Session begins.
*  The Guaranteed Allocation is the funding for the majority of students with disabilities and those who are gifted.  The term used in the GA since it was established in 2001 has been “exceptional students.”   SB 1046 now states:   exceptional students and students who are gifted in grades K through 8..   
If you did not see the floor debate, you may do so by scrolling down the page to the Senate Archives, click on April 11 and fast forward about 3 hrs. You will recognize Senator Wilson's talking points.as she presents her Amendment. ; )
HOUSE

The House passed a “total strike through amendment.” This basically means that the House was not in total agreement with all parts of SB 1046, but because this is a “conforming bill” * they needed to get it passed and moved on to the Conference Committee** so the legislature can keep moving the budget forward.
* conforming bills are tied by the hips to the Budget and technically, are not normally considered “passed” until the Budget bill is finally voted on.
** Conference Committees are established by the House and Senate leadership to hammer out compromise agreements on all bills, including the budget.
The House has heard from the gifted community about concerns regarding the bills as filed and the support for the Rivera Amendment. * The gist of that amendment is still on the table and is what FGN is supporting:
- freeze gifted funding for grades 9-12 for a year
- study the issue
- let the 2008 Legislature vote in changes, per the study and stakeholder input.
April 11, 2007
Important articles to share with ALL Stakeholders in Gifted Education


Miami Herald-Proposal would cut gifted programs



Sarasota Herald Tribune article-Funding Shuffle Could Hurt Pine View School


 
North Port Sun Newspaper-Local educators, parents concerned about gifted funding loss

 
North Port Sun Newspaper-Sarasota gifted school's funding threatened


Funding for Gifted Services is at Risk!

Those seeking this information may receive updates by visiting the Florida Gifted Network (www.floridagiftednet.org)

Those who would like to receive updates may visit:


Last week, the Senate Education Appropriations Committee approved SB 1046. This bill changes the definition of "exceptional student"  in Florida to include "students who are gifed in grades K through 8. This means that the definintion of gifted would ONLY apply to students in grades K-8.

What this means:

Gifted education would not be an entitlement of ESE services in grades 9-12
Students in grades 9-12 will no longer be defined as gifted
Students in grades 9-12 will no longer have an Educational Plan (EP)
No gifted services will be provided for students in grades 9-12
General education courses will be the ONLY course offerings for ALL students in grades 9-12, including those students who in grades K-8 had been identified as gifted

This bill goes to the floor for vote on April 11.
On Tuesday 4/9, the bill goes to the House for a second reading...they vote on it the very next day (day of the 3rd reading), Wednesday.
On Wednesday, 4/10, the bill goes to the Senate for a second reading...they vote on it the next day (day of the 3rd reading), Thursday.

What this means...

Anyone wishing to provide input on this bill must do so BEFORE Monday, 4/8.

Further information can be found at www.floridagiftednet.org

The Florida Gifted Network has reported that on March 28, 2007 the Senate Education Appropriations committee approved a measure that will restrict gifted programs/services.

To learn more about the bill, go to http://www.floridagiftednet.org/

This is very important information as it may not apply to your child now but it could apply to your child in  the future as the Sentate Education Appropriations Committee is considering restricting funding for high school which could carry over into middle school, and then elementary in the near future.

This bill will need to be approved by the Senate, so you can act by contacting our local Senator, Ronda Storms.  We need your fastidious work to contact our Senator to reject this bill.

Please when contacting Senator Storms, it is imperative that you include your address and the Senate Bill number:  SB1046.  Please let Senator Storms know that gifted services are very important to you and that our state cannot afford to decrease and or diminish these opportunities for our children.

Contact Information for Senator Storms is as follows:

District Office:                        Tallahassee Office:
313 E. Robertson Street Room 318
Brandon, FL  33511              Sentate Office Building
(813) 651-2189                   404 South Monroe Street
FAX(813)651-2188                Tallahassee, FL                                                         32399-1100
                                        (850)487-5072

Email:  storms.ronda.web@flsenate.gov



For up to the minute legislative updates and alerts regarding gifted education in Florida, consider subscribing to the Fla-gifted-alert at



URGENT ACTION ALERT - March 26, 2007
Funding for gifted services in high school is at risk!
You may read the language in the bill being proposed by the Senate Education Appropriations Committee which will restrict gifted funding in statute to grades K-8 HERE. Go to page 45 in the pdf document and read under (3)(a) "definitions."


















































Daylight Saving Time

Don't forget to set your clocks forward on Sunday, March 11th!

Daylight Savings Time (DST) was started to allow people and businesses to use daylight more effectively.  Turning the clocks back in the fall and ahead in the spring helps conserve energy.

The idea originated from none other than Benjamin Franklin!  In 1784 Ben Franklin proposed this idea as an American delegate in Paris to the French so that they could conserve energy and make better use of daylight.  Paris will change its time next Sunday.

Presently, in the United States the clocks are always turned back on the last Sunday of October and then turned forward on the first Sunday in April.

2007 marks changes for daylight savings time will
occur across the U.S.   The Energy Policy Act of 2005 will have DST extended by four weeks in the U.S.  This means that starting in 2007 clocks will be moved forward on the second Sunday in March and turned back on the first Sunday in November.

TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE:  Set aside some time this weekend for sky watching.  On Saturday night, March 3rd, there's going to be a total eclipse of the Moon.  This means the Moon will glide through the heart of Earth's shadow and turn a beautiful shade of sunset red.  Totality can be seen from parts of all seven continents including all of Europe and Africa and the eastern half of North America.  

Visit http://spaceweather.com for observing tips, maps and links to live webcasts.February 28, 2007  New Horizons, NASA's spacecraft bound for Pluto will pick up some gravity from Jupiter so that it can have enough velocity to catch Pluto.  It will also be taking pictures and collecting data.  Don't worry - it will take a few years for New Horizons to arrive.

For more information visit : http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/26feb_grandtheft.htm?list901671

More Puzzles from AIMS


       Growing Worms wormsB.jpg
In the land of Trianglia the worms are made of isosceles right triangles — and they grow fast! As you can see in the diagram, a worm that is 1 day old is made of 4 of these. You can also see worms that are 2 days old, and 3 days old. If that growth rate remains constant, how many triangles will be needed for a 4-day-old worm? A 10-day-old worm? A 63-day-old worm?
Submit your solutions to http://mathforum.org/funpow/


Mind Stretchers for the Home Stretch
If you are looking for some mental challenges to keep active minds busy, check out the many listings for challenges. If you are lucky, you’ll be able to get your “stragglers” caught up while others tackle these “toughies.”.


Science Project to try at home:

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I have had this on my desk for over a year and am always asked by students "How did you make that?"  I try to let them come up with the ingredients.  Some of them are very close.

To make the ocean in a bottle you will need:
1 clean, clear, dry bottle with flat sides (olive oil jar is perfect)
vinegar
several drops of blue food coloring
light-colored cooking oil (canola)

1.  Fill the bottle 1/3 of the way with white vinegar.
2.  Add several drops of blue food coloring
3.  Fill the rest of the jar with the light-colored cooking oil.
4.  Screw the cap on tightly; then rock the bottle back and forth to watch the waves.

Now can you figure out why this works?
taken from  Good Things For Kids  by Martha Stewart Living

This website will be updated often so please check back.

Thank you to all parents who have made many much appreciated donations to the class!  The children are putting all donated items to good use!

Wish List for the Classroom:

Treasure Box items – small toys or other misc. nonfood items that students would enjoy
(Please keep in mind that all items need to be latex free!)

Volunteers Needed -

If you have some time to spare please send me an email.  I could always use an extra hand with getting together projects for the classroom.

If you should have any questions or concerns please feel free to email me
at mary.vaughn@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Respectfully,

Mrs.Vaughn











































Space Weather News for Nov. 28, 2006

STRANGE SUNSPOT:  A strange-looking sunspot is emerging on the sun.  It's shaped like a ring almost three times wider than Earth.  Amateur astronomers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor this curious apparition. It may be little more than a novelty--but its definitely worth watching.

ALIGNMENT OF PLANETS:  Mark your calendar. On Dec. 8th through 11th, Jupiter, Mercury and Mars will form a tight triangle in the eastern sky at dawn.  All three will fit together in the field of view of ordinary binoculars. (Mars is dim enough that binoculars may be required to see it.) Of special note is the morning of Dec. 10th when Jupiter and Mercury converge within 0.25 degrees of one another.  The close, bright pair will be visible to the unaided eye--a fabulous sight in the rosy glow of sunrise.

Visit http://spaceweather.com for sky maps, images and more information.November 20, 2006

If your looking for an excellent book for your child this book has come highly recommended from our gifted supervisor, Dr. Lauri Kirsch.

Encouraging Your Child's Science Talent: The
Involved Parents' Guide. Waco, TX: Prufrock Press, 2006.

Space Weather News for Nov. 17, 2006

Every year in mid-November, Earth glides through a veritable minefield of comet dust clouds. The source of the debris is Comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. This weekend Earth will graze one of those clouds, producing a mild outburst of Leonid meteors.

If forecasters are correct, the outburst will peak around 0445 UT on Sunday, Nov. 19th (11:45 p.m. EST on Saturday, Nov. 18th). The timing favors observers in western Europe, Brazil and the Atlantic coast of North America, who could see as many as 100 meteors per hour.  Dark skies are strongly recommended.

Please visit http://spaceweather.com for sky maps and more information--including links to a meteor radar where you can listen to the Leonids.

November 8, 2006

SCIENCE BOARDS have arrived for Grade 3 students.  If you need to purchase one now is the time before they run out.  They are $1.75 each.  Please turn the monies in via your child's homeroom teacher.  ( :

November 7, 2006

Mercury's Solar Transit

Watch your computer on Wednesday - NOT THE SKY - for Mercury's Solar Transit.  This should occur starting at 2:12 PM for about 5 hours.
For online links to an online telescope camera, go to
TBO.com, Mercury's path across the sun and a schedule for the transit or use the link below.

Space Weather News for Nov. 5, 2006

TRANSIT OF MERCURY:  On Wednesday, Nov. 8th, Mercury will pass directly in front of the sun. The rare transit will be visible from the Americas, Hawaii and all around the Pacific Rim.  It begins at 2:12 p.m. EST (11:12 a.m. PST) and lasts for nearly five hours.

Because Mercury is so small, only a tiny fraction of the sun will be covered.  So don't stare at the sun on Wednesday; it will be as blinding as ever. Instead, try to view the event through a properly-filtered solar telescope. Mercury's tiny, jet-black silhouette passing in front of solar prominences, filaments and sunspots should be a marvelous sight.

Visit http://spaceweather.com for observing tips and links to live webcasts.



October 28, 2006

Daylight Saving Time

Don't forget to set your clocks back on Sunday, November4!

Daylight Savings Time (DST) was started to allow people and businesses to use daylight more effectively.  Turning the clocks back in the fall and ahead in the spring helps conserve energy.

The idea originated from none other than Benjamin Franklin!  In 1784 Ben Franklin proposed this idea as an American delegate in Paris to the French so that they could conserve energy and make better use of daylight.  Paris will change its time next Sunday.

Presently, in the United States the clocks are always turned back on the last Sunday of October and then turned forward on the first Sunday in April.

Next year  more changes for daylight savings time will occur across the U.S.   The Energy Policy Act of 2005 will have DST extended by four weeks in the U.S.  This means that starting in 2007 clocks will be moved forward on the second Sunday in March and turned back on the first Sunday in November.



It is Officially Fall!  


The Fall Equinox was September 21 which means the length of the day and night were equal. That also means that the sun rises perfectly east and sets perfectly to the west.  This will not happen again until March 21, 2007.  September 21 was also when the ancient Egyptians aligned the great pyramids in Giza, and the Druids aligned Stonehenge in Britain.  Happy Autumn!



Space Weather News for Oct. 6, 2006

HARVEST MOON:  Tonight's full moon has a special name--the "Harvest Moon." It is the full moon closest to the northern autumnal equinox. Long ago, before electric lights, farmers relied on the Harvest Moon to light up their fields at night, allowing them to harvest autumn crops even after sunset.

The Harvest Moon of 2006 is a big one--almost 12% wider than some full Moons we've seen earlier this year. Why? Because the Moon is near perigee, the side of the Moon's lopsided orbit that comes closest to Earth.

When the Harvest Moon rises tonight, go outside and look around. You might see some strange things: full story at http://spaceweather.com .



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This website will be updated often so please check back.

Thank you to all parents who have made many much appreciated donations to the class!  The children are putting all donated items to good use!

Wish List for the Classroom:

Treasure Box items – small toys or other misc. nonfood items that students would enjoy
(Please keep in mind that all items need to be latex free!)


If you should have any questions or concerns please feel free to email me
at mary.vaughn@sdhc.k12.fl.us

Respectfully,

Mrs.Vaughn



        
















                    
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Last Modified: Oct 30, 2014